Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

i have an big problem with an SQL Statement in Oracle. I want to select The TOP 10 Records ordered by STORAGE_DB wich arent in a list from an other select statement.

This one works fine for all records:

SELECT DISTINCT 
  APP_ID, 
  NAME, 
  STORAGE_GB, 
  HISTORY_CREATED, 
  TO_CHAR(HISTORY_DATE, 'DD.MM.YYYY') AS HISTORY_DATE  
  FROM HISTORY WHERE 
      STORAGE_GB IS NOT NULL AND 
        APP_ID NOT IN (SELECT APP_ID
                       FROM HISTORY
                        WHERE TO_CHAR(HISTORY_DATE, 'DD.MM.YYYY') = '06.02.2009') 

But when i am adding

AND ROWNUM <= 10
ORDER BY STORAGE_GB DESC

im getting some kind of "random" Records. I think because the limit takes in place before the order.

Does someone has an good solution? The other problem: This query is realy slow (10k+ records)

share|improve this question
    
Probable duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/2306744/… –  APC Mar 23 '10 at 6:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 67 down vote accepted

You'll need to put your current query in subquery as below :

SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT DISTINCT 
  APP_ID, 
  NAME, 
  STORAGE_GB, 
  HISTORY_CREATED, 
  TO_CHAR(HISTORY_DATE, 'DD.MM.YYYY') AS HISTORY_DATE  
  FROM HISTORY WHERE 
    STORAGE_GB IS NOT NULL AND 
      APP_ID NOT IN (SELECT APP_ID FROM HISTORY WHERE TO_CHAR(HISTORY_DATE, 'DD.MM.YYYY') ='06.02.2009')
  ORDER BY STORAGE_GB DESC )
WHERE ROWNUM <= 10

Oracle applies rownum to the result after it has been returned.
You need to filter the result after it has been returned, so a subquery is required. You can also use RANK() function to get Top-N results.

For performance try using NOT EXISTS in place of NOT IN. See this for more.

share|improve this answer
    
NOT EXISTS is not working in this scenario (invalid relational operator) APP_ID NOT EXISTS (SELEC...) –  ArneRie Mar 23 '10 at 8:22

With regards to the poor performance there are any number of things it could be, and it really ought to be a separate question. However, there is one obvious thing that could be a problem:

WHERE TO_CHAR(HISTORY_DATE, 'DD.MM.YYYY') = '06.02.2009') 

If HISTORY_DATE really is a date column and if it has an index then this rewrite will perform better:

WHERE HISTORY_DATE = TO_DATE ('06.02.2009', 'DD.MM.YYYY')  

This is because a datatype conversion disables the use of a B-Tree index.

share|improve this answer
select * from (select empno,ename,sal,row_number() over(order by sal desc nulls last) rnm
from emp) where rnm<=10
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.