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Take an excruciatingly simple batch file:

echo hi
pause

Save that as test.bat. Now, make a shortcut to test.bat. The shortcut runs the batch file, which prints "hi" and then waits for a keypress as expected. Now, add some argument to the target of the shortcut. Now you have a shortcut to:

%path%\test.bat some args

The shortcut runs the batch file as before.

Now, run the shortcut as administrator. (This is on Windows 7 by the way.) You can use either right-click -> Run as Administrator, or go to the shortcut's properties and check the box in the advanced section. Tell UAC that it's okay and once again the shortcut runs the batch file as expected.

Now, change the arguments in the target of the shortcut to add double quotes:

%path%\test.bat "some args"

Now try the shortcut as administrator. It doesn't work this time! A command window pops up and and disappears too fast to see any error. I tried adding > test.log 2>&1 to the shortcut, but no log is created in this case.

Try running the same shortcut (with the double quotes) but not as Administrator. It runs the batch file fine. So, it seems the behavior is not because of the double quoted parameters, and it's not because it's run as Administrator. It's some weird combination of the two.

I also tried running the same command from an administrator's command window. This ran the batch file as expected without error. Running the shortcut from the command window spawned a new command window which flashed and went away. So apparently the issue is caused by a combination of administrator, the shortcut, and the double quotes.

I'm totally stumped, does anyone have any idea what's going on? I'd also like a workaround.

share|improve this question
    
what about when you run the actual command on the command line. %path%\test.bat "some args". what did you see? – ghostdog74 Mar 23 '10 at 7:19
    
when running from the command line, the batch file prints "hi" and then waits for a key press, as you might expect. – XXB Mar 23 '10 at 16:17

I just ran Process Monitor on this and here is what I saw:

Run as User:

cmd /c ""C:\Users\Sunbelt\Desktop\test.bat" "some args""

Run as Admin:

"C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe" /C "C:\Users\Sunbelt\Desktop\test.bat" "some args"

For some reason, the Run as Admin case is not quoting the entire command. It seems it is trying to run the command:

C:\Users\Sunbelt\Desktop\test.bat" "some args

I would guess that since the first space is quoted it actually trying to run the following command:

"C:\Users\Sunbelt\Desktop\test.bat some" args

And in Process Monitor logs there is a file system entry of "NO SUCH FILE" for "C:\Users\Sunbelt\Desktop\test.bat some". I don't know why it is different when run as Admin, but that's what appears to be happening.

share|improve this answer
    
good info, but I'd love to have some sort of work around... – XXB Mar 23 '10 at 16:30
    
I couldn't figure out how to do it. I tried adding quotes in all kinds of places, but either the shortcut dialog would not accept that input or it resulted in the same "NO SUCH FILE" accesses. – Luke Mar 23 '10 at 18:27

To work around this, create another bat file on a path without spaces, and with a filename without spaces, that simply does this:

call "Long path to original bat file\Original bat file.bat"

This secondary bat file can be run as admin.

You can now create a shortcut to this secondary bat file and check run as admin in the shortcut's advanced options. The shortcut can be placed on a path with spaces and it can have a filename containing spaces.

share|improve this answer

In my case I just want to pass one filename as parameter, but the path has spaces.

I found a solution that worked for this case (if that's okay to truncate the file name).

Create another bat file (input_gate.bat) to remove the spaces in the path using the syntax of CALL.exe. Assuming that the shortcut is named test.lnk and is on the same route as the input_gate.bat:

call %~sdp0test.lnk %~sf1

This pass as a parameter to test.bat the full file name in short format, with administrator privileges.

  • %~sdp0 -> Is the current path (for the input_gate.bat) in short format.
  • %~sf1 -> Is the first parameter passed to input_gate.bat (in my case the full filename with spaces)
share|improve this answer

This worked for me in Windows 7:

ShortcutTarget: C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe /C myscript.bat Param1 "Param Two with spaces"
StartIn:        "C:\Path containing\my script"

Not tried it yet as Admin. I don't think it would work if myscript.bat contained spaces

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