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How to print the array's values in order of array element?

@ab= <DATA>;
print "@ab\n";
@a = qw(a b c d);
foreach $s(@ab){
   foreach $m (@a){
        $z =~m/$m/g;
        print "$z";
    }
}
__DATA__
d 43
a 5
b 24
d 4
a 12
b 54
c 11
a 1
d 1
a 32

In this program gives outputs but i expect the outputs is

a 5
a 12
a 1
a 32
b 24
b 54
c 11
d 43
d 4
d 1

First prints the first array element's matching value then second and so on.. How can i do this?

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1  
What are you actually trying to do? –  fugu Jul 27 '14 at 18:01
    
print the matching value of the array elements. When print the all array matching data of the 'a' then print next array matching data 'b' and so on. –  Bxr MKH Jul 27 '14 at 18:06
    
Is it a requirement that you use a loop or do you just want to print the sorted values? –  Tom Fenech Jul 27 '14 at 18:14

5 Answers 5

Your outer loop should loop over @a and inner over @ab

my @ab= <DATA>;
my @a = qw(a b c d);

foreach my $m (@a) {
   foreach my $s (@ab) {
        print $s if $s =~ /^$m/;
    }
}
__DATA__
d 43
a 5
b 24
d 4
a 12
b 54
c 11
a 1
d 1
a 32

output

a 5
a 12
a 1
a 32
b 24
b 54
c 11
d 43
d 4
d 1
share|improve this answer
    
Perl community missed mpapec! ;) –  jaypal singh Jul 27 '14 at 18:27
    
Bonus: This reduces the number of regex compilations from 40 to 4. –  ikegami Jul 27 '14 at 19:04
    
But it's still O(S*ID) when it could be O(S). See my answer for a solution that scales better. –  ikegami Jul 27 '14 at 19:11
    
@jaypal tnx, nice to be back. –  Сухой27 Jul 28 '14 at 6:30

It looks like you're trying to sort the array alphabetically but only based on the first letter. I think this does what you want:

use strict;
use warnings;

print sort { (substr $a, 0, 1) cmp (substr $b, 0, 1) } <DATA>;

__DATA__
d 43
a 5
b 24
d 4
a 12
b 54
c 11
a 1
d 1
a 32

Output:

a 5
a 12
a 1
a 32
b 24
b 54
c 11
d 43
d 4
d 1
share|improve this answer

Try:

@ab= <DATA>;                                                                    
@a = qw(a b c d);                                                               

print map { $tmp = $_; grep { $tmp eq (split(" ", $_))[0] } @ab } @a;           

__DATA__                                                                        
d 43                                                                            
a 5                                                                             
b 24                                                                            
d 4                                                                             
a 12                                                                            
b 54                                                                            
c 11                                                                            
a 1                                                                             
d 1                                                                             
a 32

Explanation

  • map { ... } @a: loop through each element in array @a, orderly.
  • $tmp = $_: save the current value of $_ of map function to variable $tmp.
  • grep { $tmp eq (split(" ", $_))[0] } @ab: with each element in array @ab, we split it to get only the first character, compare with current $tmp value. If equal, grep return that element.
share|improve this answer

Group the sections, and then print

use strict;
use warnings;

my %group;
while (<DATA>) {
    my ($key) = split ' ';
    push @{$group{$key}}, $_;
}

for my $key (sort keys %group) {
    print @{$group{$key}};
}

__DATA__
d 43
a 5
b 24
d 4
a 12
b 54
c 11
a 1
d 1
a 32

Outputs:

a 5
a 12
a 1
a 32
b 24
b 54
c 11
d 43
d 4
d 1
share|improve this answer
2  
Why is this down voted? It seems to answer the question –  fugu Jul 27 '14 at 18:12
    
Because I misunderstood the problem in the first 5 minutes of waking up, and someone as a quick trigger. shrug –  Miller Jul 27 '14 at 18:18

This scales better than Сухой27's answer: O(S) instead of O(ID*S).

my @ids = qw( a b c d );

my %s_by_id;
while (my $s = <DATA>) {
    my ($id) = $s =~ /^(\S+)/
       or next;

    push @{ $s_by_id{$id} }, $s;
}

for my $id (@ids) {
   print @{ $s_by_id{$id} } if $s_by_id{$id};
}
share|improve this answer
    
s/[$]ses_/$s_/ –  Brad Gilbert Jul 28 '14 at 18:44
    
@Brad Gilbert, fixed. ([] doesn't escape $) –  ikegami Jul 28 '14 at 18:55

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