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I have a div with a background image that needs to be centered horizontally and vertically. On top of that image, I also want to display a 1-line text, also centered horizontally and vertically.

I managed to get the image centered, but the text is not centered vertically. I thought vertical-align:middle would do the trick.

Here's the code I have:

<div style="background: url('background.png') no-repeat center; width:100%; height:100%; text-align:center;">
   <div style="color:#ffffff; text-align: center; vertical-align:middle;" >
       Some text here.
   </div>
</div>

Any ideas?


Workaround: I actually got this to work by using a table. (I'll probably be cursed to hell by the HTML community.) Is there any significant reason not to use this btw? I'm still interested in the solution using divs though.

 <table width="100%" height="100%">
   <tr>
     <td align="center" style="background: url('background.png') no-repeat center; color:#ffffff;">Some text here.</td>
    </tr>
</table>
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The use of tables for anything that is not tabular data has a reputation of triggering accessibility issues. However, such issues are only triggered if the table contents break upon linearization. There is a trick to test linearization: add table, tr, td { display: block; } to a testing CSS sheet: if the content remains usable/readable (despite the layout breaking) your table serializes ok; if it becomes entirely unusable, assistive technologies will have trouble to parse your table. In the case of a single-cell table, linearization can never get broken, so you should be fine. –  herenvardo Mar 29 '10 at 11:26
    
@Christophe Herreman: "Is there any significant reason not to use this btw?" In my opinion NO, there is NOT a significant reason not to use a table in this case except for auto gratification in solving a problem. For this specific task using a table is even probably a more cross-browsers solution rather than using CSS. –  Marco Demaio Mar 29 '10 at 16:14
    
@Marco Demaio There is a significant reason. It's less accessible to those who are visually impaired and use screen readers. –  ghoppe May 18 '10 at 14:06
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5 Answers

Horizontal centering of a block element is traditionally done this way:

div.inner { margin: 0 auto; }

Note: the above won't work with IE in quirks mode so always put a DOCTYPE at the top of your document to force it into standards compliant mode.

Vertical centering is much more tedious. See Vertical Centering in CSS

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the inner div has to specify a certain width to get centered i.e. "width: 300px;" –  Marco Demaio May 18 '10 at 15:16
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there is no direct vertical centering for div content in CSS, however there are indirect ways of achieving it. http://phrogz.net/CSS/vertical-align/index.html

also many similar questions in SO. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/396145/whats-the-best-way-of-centering-a-div-vertically-with-css

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2  
The 'correct' way to do it depends on how much text you are going to have. If you know what's going to be there, then it becomes much easier. –  Blair McMillan Mar 23 '10 at 9:08
    
I only have 1 line of text to show. –  Christophe Herreman Mar 23 '10 at 9:11
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In case you have to use only one line of text and parent div has fixed height use line-height property. Suppose parent height is 500px then use CSS line-height: 500px; for text.

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Without using javascript (ala something like thickbox, etc. for positioning photos/captions centered), the closest I could come to was this:

<body style="height:200px; min-height:800px;">
   <div style="background: url('background.png') no-repeat center; height:100%;">
      <div style="text-align: center; position:relative; top:50%; color:#fff;">
         Some text here.
      </div>
   </div>
</body>

Note that I had to specify some sort of height for the container (in this case the BODY but it could also have been applied to the wrapper DIV I think). In Explorer 6, you can set the BODY height to 100% but in Firefox this doesn't work and probably won't work in other modern browsers.

EDIT:

Found a better solution:

<style type="text/css">
    html, body {height:100%;}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div style="background: url('background.png') no-repeat center; height:100%;">
        <div style="text-align: center; position:relative; top:50%; color:#fff;">
            Some text here.
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
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If you want to get VERTICAL centering, I would suggest to use a table inside the DIV (as suggested by Cletus above other ways might be tedious).

div.centered table {margin: 0 auto;} /* no width needs to be specified for table */
div.centered table td {vertical-align: middle;} /* replace this with vertical-align: top; to disable vertical centering */


<!-- borders added only to help understanding -->
<div class="centered" style="border: 1px solid #cccccc;">
    <table style="border: 1px solid #ff0000;">
       <tbody>
          <tr><td>
             Some text here
          </td></tr>
       </tbody>
    </table> 
</div> 

If you are only interested in HORIZONTAL centering (no vertical) you can use only DIV:

div.centered div {margin: 0 auto; width: 300px;} /* some width MUST be specified to center a DIV. */

<!-- borders added only to help understanding -->
<div class="centered" style="border: 1px solid #cccccc;">
    <div style="border: 1px solid #ff0000;">
       Some text here
    </div> 
</div> 

As you might have noticed in order to horizontally align a DIV inside a DIV you also need to specify a fixed width for the inner DIV. This might be somehow not what you want to do, so it might be easier to use always the 1st solution (the one with TABLE) and simply remove the "vertical-align: middle;" when you want to get only horizontal centering.

I tested this using document with:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">

on IE7, FF 3.6, SAFARI 4.0.4

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