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This is a design question. I am working on a complex client-server architecture at work where several modules (always running in threads) are interdependent and often exchange information between each other. There is one entry point in the code which creates all the modules. Early in the code when there were less modules, I did not have any issues by creating and defining their relationships. Here is an example:

auto module1 = std::make_shared<Module1>();
auto module2 = std::make_shared<Module2>(module1);
auto module3 = std::make_shared<Module3>(module1);
auto module4 = std::make_shared<Module4>(module1, module3);
//and so on and so forth

As the number of modules increased, it became a necessity to make the modules part of the class. That way we can reference moduleB in moduleA, before moduleB has been created. The problem with that approach is that just the declaration in the header file is not enough. Because the moment you create the module through std::make_shared, the module that has a reference to it through another shared pointer looses the reference. So, this code, will not work:

m_module1 = std::make_shared<Module1>(m_module2);
m_module2 = std::make_shared<Module2>();

std::shared_ptr is used throughout the code, so I can't change that to something else. I need another way to solve this.

Any ideas on how to implement this?

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3 Answers 3

My interpretation of your question is that your system has changed in a way where you now have a cycle in the required creation order for your modules and you want a technique to break the cycle. Your "this doesn't work" example is a little unclear, but the essence seems to be that copying something before it exists doesn't break the cycle.

The best approach is to examine the structure of your code to remove the cycle rather than break it. Your first approach where there was a valid creation order is something worth keeping because the dependencies between the parts of the code are clear.

However, if you do have two components that are strongly coupled the basic techniques are:

  • Merge the modules causing the cycle, thereby removing the cycle.
  • Do two step creation of one module to break the cycle.

Two step creation is something like:

auto m1 = std::make_shared<Module1>();
auto m2 = std::make_shared<Module2>(m1);
m1->set_module2(m2);

There are other ways to do this, including passing a function object, passing a reference to the shared_ptr and passing a context object with methods to retrieve the appropriate shared_ptr<> value.

If there are strong rules about how these objects are created and refer to each other, writing a free function or static member function that does it properly and then returns the objects is also useful. This function can have implementation knowledge of the modules but users of the function can just call it.

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the ::SetModule() approach seemed the most reasonable to me too. But that looked kind of not elegant. Passing dependencies through the constructor makes the code more readable and less prone to bugs. I am thinking gold wrapping my modules in a wrapper class then passing the wrapper object as a reference. Would you please be able to write some pseudo code that shows your solution? –  armanali Jul 28 at 3:23
    
I do not have any cycles by the way, if by cycle you mean A points to B and B points to A. –  armanali Jul 28 at 4:04

Another way to solve strong dependency is by using message system. Declare an interface like this.

struct IModule
{
    virtual void ReceiveMessage(shared_ptr<const IMessage>);
    void SendMessage(shared_ptr<IModule> pmodule, shared_ptr<const IMessage>)
    {
        pmodule->ReceiveMessage(msg);
    }
}

Let all modules inherit this interface, and define their own ways to handle message

class Module : public IModule
{
public:
    void ReceiveMessage(shared_ptr<const IMessage> msg) override
    {
        switch (msg->GetType())
        {
            case MSG_PROCESSING_DATA:
                this->ProcessData(msg->GetData())
        }
    }

    void ProcessData(shared_ptr<DataType> data)
    {
        // original API for other modules to access this one
    }
}

The modules don't need to know each others' definitions anymore.

It is unclear what's your major concerns about dependency. This answer assumes you just don't want to include definitions of other modules when writing a module cpp.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is a simpler solution that works. Let's assume we have a class Car, that takes a Wheel object in its constructor. We declare the Wheel object, but do not initialize. Then we initialize the Car object by passing reference to the Wheel object. Then after that we create the wheel object. Because Car stores Wheel as a pointer to std::shared_ptr, this becomes possible:

class Wheel
{
private:
    int m_diameter;
public:
    Wheel(int diameter) : m_diameter(diameter)
    {

    }

    int GetDiameter()
    {
        return m_diameter;
    }
};

class Car
{
private:
    int m_startSpeed;
    std::shared_ptr<Wheel> *m_wheel;
public:
    Car(int startSpeed, std::shared_ptr<Wheel>* wheel) 
        : m_startSpeed(startSpeed), m_wheel(wheel)
    {

    }

    void Accelerate(int delta)
    {
        m_startSpeed += delta;
    }

    int GetDiameter()
    {
        return (*m_wheel)->GetDiameter();
    }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::shared_ptr<Wheel> wheel;
    auto car = std::make_shared<Car>(10, &wheel);
    wheel = std::make_shared<Wheel>(50);

    int wheelDiameter = car->GetDiameter();
    return 0;
}
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@janm, thank you for pointing out to use reference to std::shared_ptr!! –  armanali Jul 29 at 23:44
    
it sort of breaks the point of shared_ptr, because Car can hold a invalid reference to Wheel. Its reference to wheel does not increment the shared_ptr's reference count at all. –  Hsi-Hung Shih Jul 30 at 2:11
    
Maybe you could add a "shared_ptr<Wheel> m_wheellink" member in the Car class, and add a "InitializeLink()" method in Car. When it is called, it just do "m_wheellink = *m_wheel". This has to be done when m_wheel can still be dereferenced. –  Hsi-Hung Shih Jul 30 at 2:28
    
@Hsi-HungShih, I get what you are saying and yes it might kind of defeat the purpose of sharded_ptr, but in my system when you create the "modules" they don't run until unless you call ::Start() on them. So while I am creating the modules they just hold the references, the moment all modules are created all the references will be solved, so when I get to the point when I start the modules, everything will work fine. What about std::shared_ptr<std::shared_ptr<Module>>, do you think that's a better approach? –  armanali Jul 30 at 2:41
    
It will work, but the problem I could think of is performance problem. Whenever you dereference the "shared_ptr to shared_ptr", it creates a new copy of the shared_ptr, which has to do unecessary reference counting update. Furthermore, it seems that shared_ptr is not really what you want. Since you already have the Start(), just put the InitializeLink() thing in the Start() and you'll be free of such problems at the cost of some extra variable in your module class. –  Hsi-Hung Shih Jul 30 at 3:04

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