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This is more of a programming / logical question. can be answered in any programming language (i expect C/C++/Java/python, others i may not understand).

for(int i = 0 ; i < partsModelMasterList.size() ;i++)
            {
                PartsModel partsModel = partsModelMasterList.get(i);

                // compare model
                if(filterModel != null &&  partsModel.getPartModel().equalsIgnoreCase(filterModel))
                {
                    partsModelList.add(partsModel);
                }
                // compare product name
                else if(filterProduct != null && partsModel.getPartName().equalsIgnoreCase(filterProduct))
                {
                    partsModelList.add(partsModel);
                }
                // compare filterDescription
                else if(filterDescription != null && partsModel.getPartSpecs().contains(filterDescription))
                {
                    partsModelList.add(partsModel);
                }
            }

Here as you can see i compare each field differently.

So when any of the field matches the criterion it gets added to the datastructure. which i dont want unless it fulfills others too. But at the same time user may leave some fields blank which makes some of them null.

suppose it fulfils 1 but does not fulfil 2 it should be rejected.

What will be the best possible solution to the problem. Or i'll have to make 9(or whatever, im not good at maths) ifs for 3 compares.

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1  
    
Adding two more filtering options would complicate too much this code. Also, predicates over PartsModel like those usually are spread over the code; and those parts will have to handle nulls just like the others. Better to materialize your predicates into objects and insert on partsModelList based on their judgement. See how guava does it –  Thiago Kronig Jul 28 at 4:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can put all the conditions in one single if-statement like @Sanjeev suggests. However if you have many conditions, this may become hard to read.

You can also invert each condition, and skip the rest of the current iteration through the list. If you have if (a != null && a.equals( the inverse becomes if (a == null || !a.equals(.

Then your code becomes:

    for (int i = 0; i < partsModelMasterList.size(); i++) {
        PartsModel partsModel = partsModelMasterList.get(i);

        // compare model
        if (filterModel == null || !partsModel.getPartModel().equalsIgnoreCase(filterModel)) {
            continue;
        }
        // [...] Other two conditions removed for brevity

        partsModelList.add(partsModel);
    }

But in a typical filtering of this sort, what you want is:

Combine all the conditions that the user has entered a value for, but if the user has not entered a value, then do not filter on that condition.

To achieve that, you can skip the rest of the current iteration through the loop only when the user has entered a value for that particular condition, and that value does not match the current object you are examining. Your code then becomes:

    for (int i = 0; i < partsModelMasterList.size(); i++) {
        PartsModel partsModel = partsModelMasterList.get(i);

        // compare model
        if (filterModel != null && !partsModel.getPartModel().equalsIgnoreCase(filterModel)) {
            continue;
        }
        // compare product name
        else if (filterProduct != null && !partsModel.getPartName().equalsIgnoreCase(filterProduct)) {
            continue;
        }
        // compare filterDescription
        else if (filterDescription != null && !partsModel.getPartSpecs().contains(filterDescription)) {
            continue;
        }
        partsModelList.add(partsModel);
    }

I've used constructs like that in code with more than 15 conditions and I think it's a good way to keep it readable.

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You should use And operator && for

So when any of the field matches the criterion it gets added to the datastructure. which i dont want unless it fulfills others too. suppose it fulfils 1 but does not fulfil 2 it should be rejected.

if((filterModel != null &&  partsModel.getPartModel().equalsIgnoreCase(filterModel)) &&
                (filterProduct != null && partsModel.getPartName().equalsIgnoreCase(filterProduct)) &&
                (filterDescription != null && partsModel.getPartSpecs().contains(filterDescription)))
            {
                partsModelList.add(partsModel);
            }
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It depends on your context. If you want to compare multiple conditions and ensure all of them pass, you should use a logical and like

if (partsModel != null) {
  if (partsModel.getPartModel().equalsIgnoreCase(filterModel) 
      && partsModel.getPartName().equalsIgnoreCase(filterProduct) 
      && partsModel.getPartSpecs().contains(filterDescription)) {
    partsModelList.add(partsModel);
  }
}

If two or more are required and/or you depend on multiple test-cases you might prefer some fuzzy logic -

int pCount = 0;
if (partsModel != null) {
  if (partsModel.getPartModel().equalsIgnoreCase(filterModel)) pCount++;
  if (partsModel.getPartName().equalsIgnoreCase(filterProduct)) pCount++; 
  if (partsModel.getPartSpecs().contains(filterDescription)) pCount++;
}
if (pCount > 2) { // <-- or whatever your criteria is
  partsModelList.add(partsModel);
}
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