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I have the following pattern:

template <int a, int b>
class MyClass
{
public:
  template <int c>
  MyClass<a, c> operator*(MyClass<b, c> const &other) const;
};

// ../..

template <int a, int b> template <int c>
MyClass<a, c> MyClass<a, b>::operator*(MyClass<b, c> const &other) const //< error here
{
  MyClass<a, c> result;
  // ..do stuff..
  return result;
}

It doesn't compile, the error message is

Error C2975. error C2975: 'dom' : invalid argument template for 'MyClass'

If I replace template <int c> by template <int c, int d> and use it accordignly, it works fine. But I want d to be the same value as b.

My questions:

  1. Why the example doesn't work?
  2. How can I enforce d to be the same than b?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Almost +1 for "imbricated". Is that a commonly used phrase in C++ templating? –  Thilo Mar 23 '10 at 10:06
1  
Could you show the code that instantiates the template? It sounds like you might be trying to use a variable for a parameter (e.g. int number = stuff(); MyClass<1,number> thing;), when numerical template parameters must be compile-time constants. –  Mike Seymour Mar 23 '10 at 11:29
    
@Thilo: I really don't know, is it wrong. @Mike: I totally agree, but the thing is I don't instanciate it yet. –  gregseth Mar 23 '10 at 12:01
1  
Hmmm... A template taking 2 ints in its declaration and a multiplication function that returns an instance that takes the 1st template parameter from LHS and 2nd from RHS, I'll assume this is a matrix class then :P –  Grant Peters Mar 23 '10 at 12:03
2  
Unfortunately there is whole difference between visibility and accessibility. Symbols are resolved according to the visibility (ie do they exist in this scope or any parent scope, with override rule etc...) and then the accessibility is checked... –  Matthieu M. Mar 23 '10 at 13:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following code compiles fine for me (as it should).

template <int a, int b>
struct MyClass
{
    template <int c>
    MyClass<a, c> operator*(MyClass<c, b> const &other) const;
};

template <int a, int b> template <int c>
MyClass<a, c> MyClass<a, b>::operator*(MyClass<c, b> const &other) const
{
    MyClass<a, c> result;
    return result;
}

int main()
{
    MyClass<1, 2> a;
    MyClass<3, 2> b;
    a * b;
}

Note that in your code:

  1. You are returning a reference to a temporary.
  2. The operator * is not accessible from outside the class because it's private.

Please post real code and indicate the line casing the error.

share|improve this answer
    
I made some edit to make the code more accurate. Thanks for the tip about the reference. Your example compiles, mine still doesn't except if I define the body of the method inside the class (!). BTW any reasons for using the struct keyword instead of class? –  gregseth Mar 23 '10 at 12:01
    
The default access mode of struct is public, thus it saves space in examples ;) –  Georg Fritzsche Mar 23 '10 at 12:11
    
This code is now identical to yours, except for the // ..do stuff.. part. Perhaps the error is there? (Using struct makes the member public, but apart from that is exactly the same as class). –  Mike Seymour Mar 23 '10 at 12:12

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