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I have this simple problem to which I am trying to write a solution, in C.

If an array arr contains n elements, then write a program to check 
if arr[0] = arr[n-1], arr[1] = arr[n-2] and so on.

And my code looks like this-

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int arr[10],i=0,j;
    int k=0;
    printf("\n Enter 10 positive integers: \n");
    for(k=0;k<=9;k++)
    scanf("%d",&arr[k]);

    while(i<=9)
    {
        for(j=9;j>=0;j--)
        {
            if(arr[i]==arr[j])
            {
                printf("\n The array element %d is equal to array element %d\n", arr[i],arr[j]);
            }

            i++;
            continue;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

On entering this input-

 Enter 10 positive integers:
10
20
30
40
50
60
40
80
20
90

The output I get is-

 The array element 20 is equal to array element 20

 The array element 40 is equal to array element 40

 The array element 40 is equal to array element 40

 The array element 20 is equal to array element 20

Now, there are two problems with this code-

  1. As you can see, the program prints out matching array elements twice. This is because, the way I've structured the program, once the variable i loops through the array from the first to last element, and then j loops through from the last to first element. So each prints out the matching array element once, leading to two sets of values.
  2. My second question is- In my code, I've hard-coded the length of the array in the for loops(0 to 9 for an array of 10 elements). What change can be done so that the length of the array, as entered by the user, can directly be used in the for loops?

I've read that, in C, array dimensions(when declaring) cannot be a variable. So, a declaration like this(which was my first thought) wouldn't work-

int n; // n is no. of elements entered by the user

int arr[n];

I'm a newbie to programming, so my apologies if the question sounds/is too simple, low-quality.

Thank You.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

1)You can traverse the array for half times for getting the prints only once. Instead of for(j=9;j>=0;j--) you can use for(j=9;j>=9/2;j--).

2)

int n;
int arr[n].

Recent Compilers support this statement. If you don't like to use this, you can go for dynamic memory allocation for the array.

share|improve this answer
My second question is- In my code, I've hard-coded the length of the array in the for loops(0 to 9 for an array of 10 elements). What change can be done so that the length of the array, as entered by the user, can directly be used in the for loops?

Use dynamic memory allocation. Use malloc().

So code will be

{
 int num_elements;
 int* arr;
 printf("Enter number of elements\n");
 scanf("%d", &num_elements);

 arr = (int *) malloc(num_elements * sizeof(int));  // Use this 'arr' for holding input data from user

 // Your remaining code comes here


 free(arr);  // Free the pointer in the end of program
}
share|improve this answer

the variable length creation works for me:

#include<stdio.h>

int main(){
   int a, i;
   scanf("%i", &a);
   int blah[a];

   for (i = 0; i < a; i++){
      printf("/n%i", blah[a]);
   }
}

The other way would be to create the maximum length array and than simply use first n elements.

As the previous answer states it is up to you to make sure you are checking each element only once therefore stopping at the element n/2. It is probably important that n/2 is rounded to the closest smaller integer, so at first glance odd numbers of arguments may be differently handled. But as it is omitting only the middle element it is identical to itself.

share|improve this answer

For your first query

for(i=0;i<n/2;i++)
{
     if(a[i]==a[n-(i+1)])
     {
         printf("\n The array element %d is equal to array element %d\n",a[i],a[n-(i+1)]);
     }
}

For your second query you can use condition i<(n/2) (which runs the loop (n/2)-1 times) For your case where n = 10 it will run from 0 to 4.

If you want to loop from 0 to 9 you can use

for(i=0;i<n;i++)             

For making array of n elements where n is a variable either make an array of elements that is always greater than n or do it by making a dynamic array.

http://www.cs.swarthmore.edu/~newhall/unixhelp/C_arrays.html

share|improve this answer

corrected:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int i=0, size; // size of array
    int k=0;       // counter

    printf("enter size of array\n");
    scanf("%d", &size);                    // ask user for desired size
    int *arr = malloc(size * sizeof(int)); // allocate memory for array

    printf("\n Enter 10 positive integers: \n"); // fill your array of size size
    for(k=0;k<size;k++)
    scanf("%d",&arr[k]);

    k = 0;                           // reset this counter
    for(i=0; i<size/2; i++)          // check only for half of it
    {
        if(arr[i] == arr[size-i-1])   // try it with paper and pincil
        {
           printf("match arr[%d]=arr[%d]=%d\n", i,size-i-1, arr[i]);
           k++;
        }
    }

    if(k==0) printf("No matching");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the correction is helpful. However, it looks like you aren't incrementing k in the last for loop. Because of that, as it stands, you'll also get the "No Matching" statement, even when there is a match. Did you intend to increment k in the for loop every time there was a match, and then print out the value of k to indicate the number of matches? –  Manish Jul 28 '14 at 9:06
    
@DarkKnight : oh !! seems like I posted a non-complete version of the answer sorry! but yes I intended to do so, see the edit –  chouaib Jul 28 '14 at 23:53

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