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I have some trouble with a bash script, maybe someone can help me.

Inside my script, I defined variables dynamically using a loop like this:

somecolors="red yellow green blue" # read out of a file, may vary
for color in $(echo $somecolors); do
    # Actually, here is more code that generates the value I 
    # want to set for this variable, that is being written
    # into "$value"
    declare use_color_$color=$value
done

The result is that four variables have been defined:

use_color_red=1
use_color_yellow=1
use_color_green=1
use_color_blue=1

So far so good. But how can I dynamically read these? I thought of suing a "for" loop. For example:

for color in $(echo $colors); do
    echo $use_color_${color}
done

But this does not work.

How can I compose two variable names to a single one?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a reason to not use an array here? –  pfnuesel Jul 28 '14 at 8:04
    
There can also be multiple values inside the "use_color_..." variables, e. g. words (for highlighting purposes like "if line contains the word 'foo', highlight it red"). So, I need to combine two arrays, or am I wrong? –  lgsit Jul 28 '14 at 8:10
    
$(echo $colors) is redundant; $colors by itself is sufficient for iterating over the word-split expansion of the variable. –  chepner Jul 28 '14 at 13:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Better use indexed and associative arrays instead. Referencing and dereferencing variable variables that way is really wrong.

somecolors=(red yellow green blue)
declare -A use_color

for color in "${colors[@]}"; do
    use_color[$color]=$value  ## Or do you mean use_color[$color]=$color?
done

Granting $value == 1, when you do echo "${use_color[red]}" you'd get 1.

One variation:

declare colors=(red yellow green blue)

declare -A use_color    
use_color[red]=1
use_color[yellow]=1
use_color[green]=1
use_color[blue]=1

for color in "${colors[@]}"; do
    echo "use_color[$color]=${use_color[$color]}"
done

Output:

use_color[red]=1
use_color[yellow]=1
use_color[green]=1
use_color[blue]=1

Similarly:

declare -A use_color=([red]=1 [yellow]=1 [green]=1 [blue]=1)

for color in "${!use_color[@]}"; do
    echo "use_color[$color]=${use_color[$color]}"
done

Output:

use_color[yellow]=1
use_color[red]=1
use_color[blue]=1
use_color[green]=1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this solution. I will also try that. –  lgsit Jul 28 '14 at 8:15
    
This is the solution I prefer. Thanks! –  lgsit Jul 28 '14 at 10:02

The cleanest way is using variable substitution. A variable of the form ${!varabc} will match all previously defined variables beginning with varabc. In your case:

#!/bin/bash

use_color_red=1
use_color_yellow=1
use_color_green=1
use_color_blue=1

for i in ${!use_color@}; do

    printf "  name: %-16s  value: %d\n" $i ${!i}

done

exit 0

output:

name: use_color_blue    value: 1
name: use_color_green   value: 1
name: use_color_red     value: 1
name: use_color_yellow  value: 1
share|improve this answer

As mentioned in the comments, arrays might be more suited for this case. However, with bash substitution you can achieve what you described.

for color in $(echo $colors); do
    temp="use_color_$color"
    echo ${!temp}
done

To allocate a variable through substitution, use eval "$temp=\"some value\" ", for instance :

for color in $(echo $colors); do
    temp="use_color_$color"
    eval "$temp=\"$color\" "  #this allocates the name of the color to the use_color_X variable
    echo "$temp : ${!temp}"     #echoes "use_color_red : red", ...
done
share|improve this answer
    
I see. I will try both ways (what fpnuesel suggested and the bash substitution thing) and tell you the result ASAP. –  lgsit Jul 28 '14 at 8:13

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