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I have defined a Java function:

static <T> List<T> createEmptyList() {
    return new ArrayList<T>();
}

One way to call it is like so:

List<Integer> myList = createEmptyList(); // Compiles

Why can't I call it by explicitly passing the generic type argument? :

Object myObject = createEmtpyList<Integer>(); // Doesn't compile. Why?

I get the error Illegal start of expression from the compiler.

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1  
Cheekysoft explains why, but if you really feel the need add the second type def, simply add the class name before the static function call: List<Integer> myList = MyClass.<Integer>createEmptyList(); –  Aaron K May 21 '09 at 17:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

When the java compiler cannot infer the parameter type by itself for a static method, you can always pass it using the full qualified method name: Class . < Type > method();

Object list = Collections.<String> emptyList();
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For non-static methods you can use the this keyword: Object list = this.<String> emptyList(); –  Roland Oct 25 '14 at 12:48

You can, if you pass in the type as a method parameter.

static <T> List<T> createEmptyList( Class<T> type ) {
  return new ArrayList<T>();
}

@Test
public void createStringList() {
  List<String> stringList = createEmptyList( String.class );
}

Methods cannot be genericised in the same way that a type can, so the only option for a method with a dynamically-typed generic return type -- phew that's a mouthful :-) -- is to pass in the type as an argument.

For a truly excellent FAQ on Java generics, see Angelika Langer's generics FAQ.

.
.

Follow-up:

It wouldn't make sense in this context to use the array argument as in Collection.toArray( T[] ). The only reason an array is used there is because the same (pre-allocated) array is used to contain the results (if the array is large enough to fit them all in). This saves on allocating a new array at run-time all the time.

However, for the purposes of education, if you did want to use the array typing, the syntax is very similar:

static <T> List<T> createEmptyList( T[] array ) {
  return new ArrayList<T>();
}

@Test
public void testThing() {
  List<Integer> integerList = createEmptyList( new Integer[ 1 ] );
}
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1  
-1 This is a common misconception that a class literal needs to be passed into a generic method when no other arguments let the compiler infer the generic type. All that's really necessary is the syntax mentioned in Xavier's answer. Anyway, as Henrik's answer mentions, there is no real use case for specifying the type parameters of an new generic object when it's immediately assigned to a variable - only the type of that variable matters from then on, even at compile time. That's the reasoning behind Java 7's <> syntax. –  Paul Bellora Mar 30 '12 at 1:47
    
You don't use the parameter type, so just shouldn't pass it –  newacct Jul 6 '13 at 23:13

It was quite some time since I dug into those parts of Java, but...

Why you can't do it was probably a design choice by the language developers. Still, due to the type erasure employed by Java, the generics information gets dropped at compile time anyway, so in your example it would create exactly the same byte code whether you had the type parameter or not.

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@pauldoo Yes, you are quite right. It is one of the weaknesses with the java generics imho.

I response to Cheekysoft I'd like to propose to also look at how it is done by the Java people themselves, such as T[] AbstractCollection#toArray(T[] a). I think Cheekysofts version is superior, but the Java one has the advantage of familiarity.

Edit: Added link. Re-edit: Found a bug on SO :)


Follow-up on Cheekysoft: Well, as it is a list of some type that should be returned the corresponding example should look something like:

static <T> List<T> createEmptyList( List<T> a ) {
  return new ArrayList<T>();
}

But yes, passing the class object is clearly the better one. My only argument is that of familiarity, and in this exact instance it isn't worth much (in fact it is bad).

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