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I'm trying to create an class to retrieve JSON from a web API in Swift. Instead of going with delegates, I thought of using closures but I'm struggling with a few things.

let login = {(email: String, password: String) -> (Int, String) in

    let response = { (response: NSHTTPURLResponse!, data: HTTPHandler.Data!, error: NSError!) -> Void in

        var value: String? = response.allHeaderFields[HTTPHeaderFields.token] as AnyObject? as? String
        var headerData = value?.dataUsingEncoding(NSASCIIStringEncoding)
        var values: NSArray = NSJSONSerialization.JSONObjectWithData(headerData, options: .AllowFragments, error: nil) as NSArray
        println(values)
        return (values[0], values[1]) // Tuple types '(AnyObject!, AnyObject!)' and '()' have a different number of elements (2 vs. 0)
    }
    let httpHandler = HTTPHandler.POST(SERVER_URL + POSTendpoints.login, data: ["email": email, "password": password], response: response)

    return nil // Type '(Int, String)' does not conform to protocol 'NilLiteralConvertible'
}

Here is the closure I wrote. It accepts two parameters (email, password) and should return a tuple (User ID, API Token). I have a separate class called HTTPHandler which calls the server and I get and can parse the response successfully. Here's the example JSON output.

(
    2,
    JDJ5JDEwJFZ4ZkR4eXlkYUxiYS93TXUwbjBtbnUzaVhidFZBUVVtMTRJM0J3WFFBemszSVVjZ3RWd05h
)

But I can't return the value in a tuple. I get following two errors. I've commented them in the above code snippet where they occur.

I'm still struggling with closure syntax in Swift so I'm not entirely sure if I have done this right. I've defined the closure as a constant. That way can I call this closure from another class? If not, how can I make it possible to do so?

Can someone please help me to resolve these issues?

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

Regarding the first error, it seems that you should cast values elements to proper types:

return (values[0] as Int, values[1] as String)

Regarding the second error, non-optional type just can't be nil in Swift, if you want to indicate absence of value, you should change return type of your closure to (Int, String)?.

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Okay, adding the ? at the end of the return type got rid of the second error. I casted the values but still the same error persists. –  Isuru Jul 28 at 10:40

First of all, in order to return nil you need to make your closure return an optional tuple. Use (Int, String)? or (Int, String)! instead of (Int, String)

You're getting the error "Tuple types '(AnyObject!, AnyObject!)' and '()' have a different number of elements" because you're trying to return a (Int, String) tuple instead of Void which is what the closure returns.

I can't test it myself right now, but it would look something like this:

let login = {(email: String, password: String) -> (Int, String)? in

    var returnTuple: (Int, String)? = nil
    let response = { (response: NSHTTPURLResponse!, data: HTTPHandler.Data!, error: NSError!) -> Void in

        var value: String? = response.allHeaderFields[HTTPHeaderFields.token] as AnyObject? as? String
        var headerData = value?.dataUsingEncoding(NSASCIIStringEncoding)
        var values: NSArray = NSJSONSerialization.JSONObjectWithData(headerData, options: .AllowFragments, error: nil) as NSArray
        println(values)
        returnTuple = (values[0], values[1])
    }
    let httpHandler = HTTPHandler.POST(SERVER_URL + POSTendpoints.login, data: ["email": email, "password": password], response: response)

    return returnTuple
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. The errors are gone. And it works up to some point. The first time it returns returnTuple, it's value is nil, obviously. Then once the JSON is parsed and values are assigned to returnTuple, it won't return. Any idea why that is? –  Isuru Jul 28 at 11:13
    
Not really. Add a few printlns or breakpoints to see where your code is going maybe. Make sure it is getting to the end of the function and not getting caught up somewhere –  connor Jul 28 at 11:22

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