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I have this sql:

ALTER TABLE dbo.ChannelPlayerSkins
    DROP CONSTRAINT FK_ChannelPlayerSkins_Channels

but apparently, on some other databases we use, the constraint has a different name. How do I check if there's a constraint with the name FK_ChannelPlayerSkins_Channels.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 105 down vote accepted

try this:

SELECT
    * 
    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS 
    WHERE CONSTRAINT_NAME ='FK_ChannelPlayerSkins_Channels'

-- EDIT --

When I originally answered this question, I was thinking "Foreign Key" because the original question asked about finding "FK_ChannelPlayerSkins_Channels". Since then many people have commented on finding other "constraints" here are some other queries for that:

--Returns one row for each CHECK, UNIQUE, PRIMARY KEY, and/or FOREIGN KEY
SELECT * 
    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS
    WHERE CONSTRAINT_NAME='XYZ'  


--Returns one row for each FOREIGN KEY constrain
SELECT * 
    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS 
    WHERE CONSTRAINT_NAME='XYZ'


--Returns one row for each CHECK constraint 
SELECT * 
    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CHECK_CONSTRAINTS
    WHERE CONSTRAINT_NAME='XYZ'

here is an alternate method

--Returns 1 row for each CHECK, UNIQUE, PRIMARY KEY, FOREIGN KEY, and/or DEFAULT
SELECT 
    OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID) AS NameofConstraint
        ,SCHEMA_NAME(schema_id) AS SchemaName
        ,OBJECT_NAME(parent_object_id) AS TableName
        ,type_desc AS ConstraintType
    FROM sys.objects
    WHERE type_desc LIKE '%CONSTRAINT'
        AND OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID)='XYZ'

If you need even more constraint information, look inside the system stored procedure master.sys.sp_helpconstraint to see how to get certain information. To view the source code using SQL Server Management Studio get into the "Object Explorer". From there you expand the "Master" database, then expand "Programmability", then "Stored Procedures", then "System Stored Procedures". You can then find "sys.sp_helpconstraint" and right click it and select "modify". Just be careful to not save any changes to it. Also, you can just use this system stored procedure on any table by using it like EXEC sp_helpconstraint YourTableNameHere.

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Works like a charm –  Eran Medan Mar 22 '11 at 1:08
1  
One thing to note, in my SQL to add the constraint, I used brackets around the name like, [fk_Client_ProjectID_Project]. You MUST remove the brackets in the WHERE clause. –  ScubaSteve Jun 18 '13 at 13:33
2  
There's nothing wrong in brackets. This is a SQL Server question, not a MySQL one. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 25 at 17:45
    
If it's a Unique Constraint you need a slightly different version: IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS where CONSTRAINT_NAME = 'UNIQUE_Order_ExternalReferenceId') BEGIN ALTER TABLE Order ADD CONSTRAINT UNIQUE_Order_ExternalReferenceId UNIQUE (ExternalReferenceId) END –  The Coder Apr 15 at 21:00
    
The above didn't work for a unique column constraint (SQL2008). I had to use the following: SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE WHERE CONSTRAINT_NAME='UC_constraintName' –  Alan B. Dee Aug 19 at 0:05
IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sys.foreign_keys WHERE parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.TableName'))
 BEGIN 
ALTER TABLE TableName DROP CONSTRAINT CONSTRAINTNAME 
END 
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If you are looking for other type of constraint, e.g. defaults, you should use different query (From How do I find a default constraint using INFORMATION_SCHEMA? answered by devio). Use:

SELECT * FROM sysobjects WHERE xtype = 'D' AND name = @name

to find a default constraint by name.

I've put together different 'IF not Exists" checks in my post "DDL 'IF not Exists" conditions to make SQL scripts re-runnable"

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sysobjects will be removed in future versions. Please use sys.objects instead –  Ramon Araujo Jul 8 at 23:03

I use the following query to check for an existing constraint before I create it.

IF (NOT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sysconstraints WHERE OBJECT_NAME(constid) = 'UX_CONSTRAINT_NAME' AND OBJECT_NAME(id) = 'TABLE_NAME')) BEGIN
...
END

This queries for the constraint by name targeting a given table name. Hope this helps.

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I use this to check for and remote constraints on a column. It should have everything you need.

DECLARE
  @ps_TableName VARCHAR(300)
  , @ps_ColumnName VARCHAR(300)

SET @ps_TableName = 'mytable'
SET @ps_ColumnName = 'mycolumn'

DECLARE c_ConsList CURSOR LOCAL STATIC FORWARD_ONLY FOR
    SELECT
    'ALTER TABLE ' + RTRIM(tb.name) + ' drop constraint ' + sco.name AS csql
    FROM
        sys.Objects tb
        INNER JOIN sys.Columns tc on (tb.Object_id = tc.object_id)
        INNER JOIN sys.sysconstraints sc ON (tc.Object_ID = sc.id and tc.column_id = sc.colid)
        INNER JOIN sys.objects sco ON (sc.Constid = sco.object_id)
    where
        tb.name=@ps_TableName
        AND tc.name=@ps_ColumnName
OPEN c_ConsList
FETCH c_ConsList INTO @ls_SQL
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0) BEGIN

    IF RTRIM(ISNULL(@ls_SQL, '')) <> '' BEGIN
        EXECUTE(@ls_SQL)
    END
    FETCH c_ConsList INTO @ls_SQL
END
CLOSE c_ConsList
DEALLOCATE c_ConsList
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Easiest way to check for the existence of a constraint (and then do something such as drop it if it exists) is to use the OBJECT_ID() function...

IF OBJECT_ID('CK_ConstraintName', 'C') IS NOT NULL 
    ALTER TABLE dbo.[tablename] DROP CONSTRAINT CK_ConstraintName

OBJECT_ID can be used without the second parameter ('C' for check constraints only) and that may also work, but if your constraint name matches the name of other objects in the database you may get unexpected results.

IF OBJECT_ID('CK_ConstraintName') IS NOT NULL 
    ALTER TABLE dbo.[tablename] DROP CONSTRAINT CK_ConstraintName

OBJECT_ID can also be used with other "constraints" such as Foreign Key constraints or Primary Key constraints, etc. For best results, always include the appropriate object type as the second parameter for the OBJECT_ID function:

Constraint Object Types:

  • C = CHECK constraint
  • D = DEFAULT (constraint or stand-alone)
  • F = FOREIGN KEY constraint
  • PK = PRIMARY KEY constraint
  • R = Rule (old-style, stand-alone)
  • UQ = UNIQUE constraint
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5  
The important thing is to add schema name in the parameter to OBJECT_ID like this: IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.CK_ConstraintName', 'C') IS NOT NULL. Without specifying schema it returns NULL. –  gator88 Apr 14 at 10:07
    
@gator88 Thank you Gator. –  Kittoes May 13 at 19:39
    
Hi, thanks for your answer, it's really helpful. Just wondering if it applies for Oracle? –  allentranks Oct 3 at 3:21

Just something to watch out for......

In SQL Server 2008 R2 SSMS, the "Script Constraint as -> DROP And CREATE To" command produces T-SQL like below

USE [MyDatabase]
GO

IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = OBJECT_ID(N'[DEF_Detail_IsDeleted]') AND type = 'D')
BEGIN
ALTER TABLE [Patient].[Detail] DROP CONSTRAINT [DEF_Detail_IsDeleted]
END

GO

USE [MyDatabase]
GO

ALTER TABLE [Patient].[Detail] ADD  CONSTRAINT [DEF_Detail_IsDeleted]  DEFAULT ((0)) FOR [IsDeleted]
GO

Out of the box, this script does NOT drop the constraint because the SELECT returns 0 rows. (see post Microsoft Connect).

The name of the default constraint is wrong but I gather it also has something to do with the OBJECT_ID function because changing the name doesn't fix the problem.

To fix this, I removed the usage of OBJECT_ID and used the default constraint name instead.

(SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE [name] = (N'DEF_Detail_IsDeleted') AND type = 'D')
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1  
Looks like the script doesn't schema qualify the name. Would be safer to use OBJECT_ID(N'[YourSchema].[DEF_Detail_IsDeleted]') in case you have 2 constraints of the same name in different schemas. –  Martin Smith Jun 21 '12 at 22:11
IF (OBJECT_ID('FK_ChannelPlayerSkins_Channels') IS NOT NULL)
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Are you looking at something like this, below is tested in SQL Server 2005

SELECT * FROM sys.check_constraints WHERE 
object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[CK_accounts]') AND 
parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo]. [accounts]')
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INFORMATION_SCHEMA is your friend. It has all kinds of views that show all kinds of schema information. Check your system views. You will find you have three views dealing with constraints, one being CHECK_CONSTRAINTS.

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6  
Look at the next answer. –  zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Jun 30 '11 at 20:10

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