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I am using http://validator.w3.org to validate my code.

However I have 45 errors, largely related to duplicate id's.

I thought where possible it would be a good pratctice to re use CSS.

Example code:

CSS

#cloudbullet {
background-color: #85c0bf;
height: 22px;
left: 13px;
margin-top: 7px;
position: relative;
top: 63px;
width: 20px;

HTML

<div id="container1-title" class="">
        <h2>Cloud/Hosting</h2>
        </div>

        <div id="cloudbullet" class="">
        </div>
        <div id="cloudbullet" class="">
        </div>
        <div id="cloudbullet" class="">
        </div>
        <div id="cloudbullet" class="">
        </div>
        <div id="cloudbullet" class="">
        </div>
        <div id="cloudbullet" class="">
        </div>

The effect being that I get 6 css boxes in a vertical row.

Please can someone advise if what I have done is correct and if I should ignore the validation or does this need to be done in a different way?

Thanks,

share|improve this question
1  
use class instead of id – Suresh Ponnukalai Jul 28 '14 at 10:40
3  
Think of IDs like phone numbers, car plates or Social Security numbers. They become fairly useless if they aren't unique. – Álvaro González Jul 28 '14 at 10:42
up vote 4 down vote accepted

For something that appear several times, you want something that classifies them, not identifies them. An id should be unique in the page.

Eventhough some things work with duplicate identifiers, it's not certain that it works the same in all browsers, and some things certainly won't work. If you for example want to use the identifier to find the elements using Javascript, you will run into problems.

Use the class attribute intead. CSS:

.cloudbullet {
  background-color: #85c0bf;
  height: 22px;
  left: 13px;
  margin-top: 7px;
  position: relative;
  top: 63px;
  width: 20px;
}

HTML:

<div id="container1-title">
  <h2>Cloud/Hosting</h2>
</div>

<div class="cloudbullet">
</div>
<div class="cloudbullet">
</div>
<div class="cloudbullet">
</div>
<div class="cloudbullet">
</div>
<div class="cloudbullet">
</div>
<div class="cloudbullet">
</div>
share|improve this answer

An id explicitly is unique. Only a single element in the document must have the id. That's why it's called an id, it's a unique identifier.

If you want to apply the same rule to multiple elements, that's what CSS classes are for.

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