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When I run perl, I get the warning:

perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
    LANGUAGE = (unset),
    LC_ALL = (unset),
    LANG = "en_US.UTF-8"
are supported and installed on your system.
perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C").

Any ideas on how to fix it?

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What OS? What distribution? –  Sinan Ünür Mar 23 '10 at 15:26
    
What happened when you checked the locale settings like the error message told you? –  brian d foy Mar 23 '10 at 17:13
    
instead of installing the locale, you can also change the locale. On my Ubuntu box, this is done for one user by editing ~/.pam_environment –  Janus Troelsen Jun 8 at 12:34
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12 Answers 12

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Your OS doesn't know about en_US.UTF-8.

You didn't mention a specific platform, but I can reproduce your problem:

% uname -a
OSF1 hunter2 V5.1 2650 alpha
% perl -e exit
perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
    LC_ALL = (unset),
    LANG = "en_US.UTF-8"
    are supported and installed on your system.
perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C").

My guess is you used ssh to connect to this older host from a newer desktop machine. It's common for /etc/ssh/sshd_config to contain

AcceptEnv LANG LC_*

which allows clients to propagate into new sessions the values of those environment variables.

The warning gives you a hint about how to squelch it if you don't require the full-up locale:

% env LANG=C perl -e exit
%

or with bash:

$ LANG=C perl -e exit
$ 

For a permanent fix, choose one of

  1. On the older host, set the LANG environment variable in your shell's initialization file.
  2. Modify your environment on the client side, e.g., rather than ssh hunter2, use the command LANG=C ssh hunter2.
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2  
Thanks! I had this error message when connecting with git to my server. After adding de_CH.UTF-8 (was not supported there but used locally) with dpkg-reconfigure locales the message is gone. –  Simon A. Eugster Oct 28 '12 at 20:22
6  
I had this issue for ages,... removing "AcceptEnv LANG LC_*" from sshd_config finally resolved it. Thanks for the hint! –  madc Jan 11 '13 at 19:55
1  
and you must reboot the server. –  Hermann Ingjaldsson Apr 28 '13 at 18:50
1  
@Greg Bacon, Wouldn't there also be cases in which you would want to set the environment variables system wide, for example by creating an /etc/environment file? help.ubuntu.com/community/… –  fraxture Feb 8 at 11:05
1  
@HermannIngjaldsson, at least on Ubuntu (12.10), there was no need to reboot the server (after removing "AcceptEnv LANG LC_*"). I just reloaded ssh config: service ssh reload, which takes a fraction of a second, and doesn't even cause the current ssh session to terminate. –  noamtm Apr 6 at 11:21
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Here is how to solve it on Mac OS Lion (10.7):

Add the following lines to your bashrc or bash_profile on the host machine:

# Setting for the new UTF-8 terminal support in Lion
export LC_CTYPE=en_US.UTF-8
export LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8

If you are using zsh, edit zshrc:

# Setting for the new UTF-8 terminal support in Lion
LC_CTYPE=en_US.UTF-8
LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8
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1  
Thanks, I've search a solution for this problem for a long time, and I always thought it's a problem in my Ubuntu server configuration, and it seemed that there was no solution that helped (all that dkpg-reconfigure stuff( –  Teemu Kurppa Apr 20 '12 at 14:46
    
Helped me out big time! –  Rijk May 15 '12 at 14:24
    
Because LC_ALL overwrites all other variables, I’d rather set LANG=de_AT.UTF-8 and individual variables like LC_MESSAGES=en_US.UTF-8. If a variable is not set it falls back to LANG. You can also eg. unset LC_CTYPE to force it fall back to LANG. –  David C. Mar 4 '13 at 21:04
2  
Placing those lines in .bashrc didn't work, but bash_profile solved it! I had to create the file. –  Hermann Ingjaldsson May 10 '13 at 8:32
    
Putting these lines in ~/.bashrc solved it for me... then must reload using source ~/.bashrc... Thnks <3 –  Enissay Aug 2 '13 at 12:22
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If you are creating a rootfs using debootstrap you will need to generate the locales. You can do this by running:

sudo locale-gen en_US.UTF-8

This tip comes from, https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Xen

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This is the real fix for me. –  afriza Oct 24 '13 at 17:23
1  
locale-gen does not take any arguments (in Debian stable at least). Instead, edit /etc/locale.gen to uncomment the locales you want, then run sudo locale-gen –  Sam Watkins Feb 6 at 2:23
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This generally means you haven't properly set up locales on your Linux box.

On Debian or Ubuntu, that means you need to do

$ sudo locale-gen
$ sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales

See also man locale-gen.

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8  
does not fix the issue here –  Somatik Aug 28 '12 at 10:41
2  
dpkg-reconfigure locales - fixed the issue for me, debian 7.1 –  newUserNameHere Sep 23 '13 at 23:11
    
Worked for Ubuntu 13.10! –  Filip Stefansson Mar 23 at 17:56
    
dpkg-reconfigure locales fails itself with the same perl locale error messages that one is trying to fix in the first place!!!! –  matteo Apr 5 at 21:52
    
This worked for me in Ubuntu 14.04, although I had to add the missing locale first with sudo locale-gen es_UY.UTF-8 –  alfonso May 27 at 22:12
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export LANGUAGE=en_US.UTF-8
export LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8
export LANG=en_US.UTF-8
export LC_TYPE=en_US.UTF-8

It's works for debian. I don't know why - but local-gen had not results.

Important! It's temporary solution. Have to be run each session.

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This one worked for me. I just put it into my .bashrc file. –  DarkCthulhu Jun 8 at 16:08
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I know this answer is not much related to the question but just want to answer so the other guys having same problem with git can resolve it.

I was getting same warning when working with git and it annoys me a lot, Here is what I was getting

$ git pull
perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
    LANGUAGE = (unset),
    LC_ALL = (unset),
    LC_CTYPE = "UTF-8",
    LANG = (unset)
    are supported and installed on your system.
perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C"). 

Then I found something on web, just change your terminal preference as below. Check/Uncheck accordingly and restart your terminal and it will work.

P.S. For mac users only

enter image description here

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1  
Wow, so simple and fixed my problems! Thanks! –  siemic Jan 20 at 17:01
    
You only need to disable the "Set locale environment variable on startup". the other settings are not related with this problem. –  J. Costa Feb 17 at 15:11
    
I haven't tried it but will see if last option is sufficient –  Inder Kumar Rathore Feb 17 at 17:45
    
I tried all the others but this one did it for me. I use iTerm and it has the same character encoding option. –  Michael Morrison Apr 25 at 3:26
    
This worked great for me. Thanks for the tip. –  Max Wyss May 5 at 18:03
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Following the accepted answer:

LANG=C ssh hunter2.

LC_ALL=C ssh hunter2 on client side did the trick for me

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Adding the following to /etc/environment fixed the problem for me on Debian and Ubuntu (of course, modify to match the locale you want to use):

LANGUAGE=en_US.UTF-8
LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8
LANG=en_US.UTF-8
LC_TYPE=en_US.UTF-8
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.. I got a warning saying setting locale in /etc/environment is deprecated and should instead be set in /etc/default/locale. Both seems to work for now. –  joscarsson Feb 19 at 22:17
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sudo nano /etc/locale.gen

Uncomment the locales you want to use (e.g. en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8):

Then run:

sudo /usr/sbin/locale-gen

Source: http://people.debian.org/~schultmc/locales.html

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You need to configure locale appropriately in /etc/default/locale, logout, login, and then run the regular commands

root@host:~# echo -e 'LANG=en_US.UTF-8\nLC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8' > /etc/default/locale
root@host:~# exit
local-user@local:~$ ssh root@host
root@host:~# locale-gen en_US.UTF-8
root@host:~# dpkg-reconfigure locales
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If you are running a chroot in CentOS, try manually copying /usr/lib/locale.

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Another git related answer:

The source of the problem might be the git server. If all else fails, try doing dpkg-reconfigure locales (or whatever is appropriate for your distribution) on the server.

Credits: This tip is from http://softwareinabottle.wordpress.com/2011/12/20/fixing-the-pesky-perl-warning-setting-locale-failed-on-ubuntu-server/ and solved the problem in my case.

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