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What I want to accomplish: I want to use a typedef'd function pointer inside of a typedef'd struct where the function pointer takes a struct pointer as an argument (i.e. something like an 'object method' which takes a self-reference to the 'object').

I have this C code (simplified, hopefully not oversimplified):

typedef struct MYSTRUCT myStruct;

typedef void (*getSomething)(myStruct*);

typedef struct MYSTRUCT {
    getSomething get_something;
};

void get_property() {
    myStruct *structure = NULL;
}

So what I think I'm doing is: forward declare the struct, use that declaration in the function pointer typedef, then declare the actual struct using the typedef'd function pointer.

This code compiles with the intel compiler on linux (and seems to do the intended thing) but the Visual compiler throws an error:

error C2275: 'myStruct' : illegal use of this type as an expression see declaration of myStruct

Is there a way to make the VC accept my intended construct?

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Is the visual-c++ tag really appropriate? –  pmr Jul 28 at 15:05
1  
I added it because the Visual compiler threw the error and in the explanation of the tag C was mentioned. –  user1573870 Jul 28 at 15:21
    
Now C xor C++? –  The Paramagnetic Croissant Jul 28 at 15:43
    
C but only the visual-c++ tag exists, no visual-c tag. I would have used visual-c had it existed. –  user1573870 Jul 28 at 15:46

3 Answers 3

typedef struct MYSTRUCT {
    getSomething get_something;
};

should be

struct MYSTRUCT {
    getSomething get_something;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing that out - fixed it. (Although it was not the cause of the error, but rather my stupidity was). –  user1573870 Jul 28 at 15:13
struct MYSTRUCT;                  // Forward declare the struct
typedef struct MYSTRUCT myStruct; // define the typedef;

typedef void (*getSomething)(myStruct*);   // use the typedef;

struct MYSTRUCT {                 // define the struct
    getSomething get_something;
};

void get_property() {             // use the typedef again.
    myStruct *structure = NULL;
}

// Warning: I didn't actually compile that, and I'm going from memory.
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I had tried that, but it didn't change anything since the original cause of the error was a different one. –  user1573870 Jul 28 at 15:14
    
My reading of C99 standard suggests that it is not necessary to forward declare the struct MYSTRUCT... the typedef struct MYSTRUCT mystruct is sufficient to declare an incomplete struct MYSTRUCT and an incomplete typedef'd type mystruct. I use this a lot, so I'm really hoping my reading of the standard is correct ! –  gmch Jul 28 at 15:37
    
@gmch - Quite possible. I'm more of a C++ expert than C, and know few of the c89->c99 changes. (And even with C++, I know C++98 better than C++11) –  James Curran Jul 28 at 15:40

Sorry. I just realized this was not a problem of my forward declaration but rather because what I really did in my actual code was this:

void get_property() {
    some = assignment_statement;
    myStruct *structure = NULL;
}

I.e. I accidentally put my variable declaration + definition below the first code statement. So indeed, I had oversimplified my code fragment. Sorry for this.

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1  
That's one reason for writing complete examples you've tested before by compiling and running (in this case, only the former, of course) and know that the simplified code reproduces the problem. –  mafso Jul 28 at 15:22
    
@user1573870 - Mark this as answered to close the loop. :) –  ryyker Jul 28 at 15:43
    
I cannot accept my own answer before two days. @mafso Yes, you are right, my apologies. –  user1573870 Jul 28 at 15:47

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