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I am working on a simple relationship with DataMapper, a ruby webapp to track games. A game belongs_to 4 players, and each player can have many games. When I call player.games.size, I seem to be getting back a result of 0, for players that I know have games associated with them. I am currently able to pull the player associations off of game, but can't figure out why player.games is empty. Do I need to define a parent_key on the has n association, or is there something else I'm missing?

class Game
  belongs_to :t1_p1, :class_name => 'Player', :child_key => [:player1_id]
  belongs_to :t1_p2, :class_name => 'Player', :child_key => [:player2_id]
  belongs_to :t2_p1, :class_name => 'Player', :child_key => [:player3_id]
  belongs_to :t2_p2, :class_name => 'Player', :child_key => [:player4_id]
  ...
end

class Player
  has n, :games
  ...
end
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3 Answers 3

Still haven't figured out a way that feels right, but for now I am using the following workaround. Anyone know of a better way to accomplish this?

class Player
  has n, :games # accessor doesn't really function...
  def games_played
    Game.all(:conditions => ["player1_id=? or player2_id=? or player3_id=? or player4_id=?", id, id, id, id])
  end
end
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Have you tried the following:

class Game
  has n, :Players, :through => Resource
end

class Player
  has n, :Games, :through => Resource
end

I'm looking for a related bug now.

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I think :through => Resource will create an association table and an array on the objects. I was hoping I could keep individual fields, but I guess you could always create accessors or change the object models a bit. –  jing Jul 13 '10 at 14:33

You should be able to use Single Table Inheritance to achieve the desired result. Although you may need to do some thinking about how you to handle players being Player One in one game and Player Two in another.

My example code is just for reference. It has not been tested but should work.

class Player
    property :id,             Serial
    property :name,           String
    property :player_number,  Discriminator
end

class PlayerOne < Player
  has n, :games, :child_key => [ :player1_id ]
end

class PlayerTwo < Player
  has n, :games, :child_key => [ :player2_id ]
end

class PlayerThree < Player
  has n, :games, :child_key => [ :player3_id ]
end

class PlayerFour < Player
  has n, :games, :child_key => [ :player4_id ]
end

class Game
  belongs_to :player1, :class_name => 'PlayerOne',    :child_key => [:player1_id]
  belongs_to :player2, :class_name => 'PlayerTwo',    :child_key => [:player2_id]
  belongs_to :player1, :class_name => 'PlayerThree',  :child_key => [:player3_id]
  belongs_to :player2, :class_name => 'PlayerFour',   :child_key => [:player4_id]
end
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