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I am attempting to create a dynamic sort for my basic data class (just a bunch of properties). The following code demonstrates what I am trying to do. It almost works. The only thing I don't understand is why ThenBy seems to completely resort the list. Can anyone explain why?

private void SortList(string[] sortCols)
{
    bool first = true;
    IOrderedEnumerable<Data> returnVal = null;

    Console.WriteLine("Sorting test data");

    if (sortCols.Length < 1)
        return;

    foreach (string col in sortCols)
    {

        if (first)
        {
            returnVal = _testData.OrderBy(p => typeof(Data).GetProperty(col).GetValue(p, null));
            //Or OrderByDescending
            first = false;
        }
        else
        {
            returnVal = returnVal.ThenBy(p => typeof(Data).GetProperty(col).GetValue(p, null));
            //Or ThenByDescending

        }

    }


    _testData = new List<Data>(returnVal);

}

_testData is just a List The Data class looks like this:

public class Data
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public double Income { get; set; }
    public bool Married { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Name + "; age=" + Age.ToString() + "; income=" + Income.ToString() + "; married=" + Married.ToString();
    }
}
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HEADS UP: This code does work in 4.5 but does not work in 4.0. In 4.0, it breaks as described. –  Branden Boucher Jul 28 '14 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unable to duplicate your problem. Everything seems to sort properly:

public static void Main()
{
    var data1 = new Data() { Name = "Albert", Age = 99 };
    var data2 = new Data() { Name = "Zebra", Age = 1};
    var data3 = new Data() { Name = "Zebra", Age = 99};
    var data4 = new Data() { Name = "Albert", Age = 1 };

    _testData.Add(data1);
    _testData.Add(data2);
    _testData.Add(data3);
    _testData.Add(data4);

    SortList(new string[] { "Name", "Age" });

    foreach(var data in _testData)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(data.ToString());
    }

    Console.WriteLine(string.Empty);

    SortList(new string[] { "Age", "Name" });

    foreach(var data in _testData)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(data.ToString());
    }
}

Results:

Sorting test data

Albert; age=1; income=0; married=False

Albert; age=99; income=0; married=False

Zebra; age=1; income=0; married=False

Zebra; age=99; income=0; married=False

.

Sorting test data

Albert; age=1; income=0; married=False

Zebra; age=1; income=0; married=False

Albert; age=99; income=0; married=False

Zebra; age=99; income=0; married=False

Update (For .Net 4.0)

Changing your code slightly solves the issue (example):

private static void SortList(string[] sortCols)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Sorting test data");

    if (sortCols.Length < 1)
        return;

    IOrderedEnumerable<Data> returnVal = _testData.OrderBy(p => typeof(Data).GetProperty(sortCols[0]).GetValue(p, null));

    foreach (string col in sortCols.Skip(1))
    {
        returnVal = returnVal.ThenBy(p => typeof(Data).GetProperty(col).GetValue(p, null));
        //Or ThenByDescending
    }

    _testData = returnVal.ToList();
}
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You only have two data points. You can't test sorting by multiple columns with only two data points. Just humor me and try a third, where either the name or the age is the same as in another data point. –  Branden Boucher Jul 28 '14 at 20:13
    
Sure I can, you said why ThenBy seems to completely resort the list., the ThenBy is sorting, but the list is not out of order. But I'll update to prove the point explicitly instead of implicitly. –  Erik Philips Jul 28 '14 at 20:15
    
You can also use linq to create the list _testData = returnVal.Tolist(); –  Erik Philips Jul 28 '14 at 20:19
    
There must be something else missing here @Erik Philips. I assume you copied my SortList method exactly? –  Branden Boucher Jul 28 '14 at 20:21
    

You're better off creating an IComparer that explicitly does a comparison for each property (so you could have a public property on it that specifies the property order). You could then just sort once.

Something like so

public class DataComparer : Comparer<Data>
{
    private readonly IList<string> _sortedProperties;

    public DataComparer(IEnumerable<string> sortedProperties)
    {
        _sortedProperties = new List<string>(sortedProperties);
    }

    public override int Compare(Data x, Data y)
    {
        int result = 0;
        foreach (var property in _sortedProperties)
        {
            if (property == "Name")
            {
                result = String.Compare(x.Name, y.Name, StringComparison.Ordinal);
            }
            else if (property == "Age")
            {
                result = x.Age.CompareTo(y.Age);
            }

            // Do other comparisons here

            if (result != 0)
                return result;
        }

        return 0;
    }
}

This implementation will create a DataComparer with the given collection of properties that act as the properties that need to be compared. Then the Compare() will loop through the properties in the desired sort order until it finds a non-matching comparison and return.

The end result will be a faster sort operation that outputs something like

// "Jim Frost" 13
// "Jim Frost" 24
// "Jim Smith" 11

Where we want to sort on the Name property first, then the Age etc.

Edit:

You can sort it like so,

_testData.Sort(new DataComparer(sortCols));
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I'm going to have to go with some solution like this since 4.0 isn't working right with ThenBy. Thanks @Greg B –  Branden Boucher Jul 28 '14 at 20:49
    
This method will sort faster than using reflection and OrderBy as well, if that's a concern :) –  Greg B Jul 29 '14 at 13:21

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