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I needed to write a script to enter multi-line input to a program (psql)

After a bit of googling, I found the following syntax works:

cat << EOF | psql ---params
BEGIN;

`pg_dump ----something`

update table .... statement ...;

END;
EOF

This correctly constructs the multi-line string (from BEGIN; to END;, inclusive) and pipes it as an input to psql.

but I have no idea how/why it works, can some one please explain?

I'm referring mainly to cat << EOF, I know > outputs to a file, >> appends to a file, < reads input from file.

What does "<<" exactly do?

And is there a man page for it?

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6  
That's probably a useless use of cat. Try psql ... << EOF ... See also "here strings". mywiki.wooledge.org/BashGuide/InputAndOutput?#Here_Strings –  Dennis Williamson Mar 23 '10 at 18:28
    
@Dennis: good point, and thanks for the link! –  hasenj Mar 23 '10 at 18:54
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3 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted

This is heredoc format to put a string into stdin. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_document#Unix-Shells for detail.


From man bash:

Here Documents

This type of redirection instructs the shell to read input from the current source until a line containing only word (with no trailing blanks) is seen.

All of the lines read up to that point are then used as the standard input for a command.

The format of here-documents is:

          <<[-]word
                  here-document
          delimiter

No parameter expansion, command substitution, arithmetic expansion, or pathname expansion is performed on word. If any characters in word are quoted, the delimiter is the result of quote removal on word, and the lines in the here-document are not expanded. If word is unquoted, all lines of the here-document are subjected to parameter expansion, command substitution, and arithmetic expansion. In the latter case, the character sequence \<newline> is ignored, and \ must be used to quote the characters \, $, and `.

If the redirection operator is <<-, then all leading tab characters are stripped from input lines and the line containing delimiter. This allows here-documents within shell scripts to be indented in a natural fashion.

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I was having the hardest time disabling variable/parameter expansion. All I needed to do was use "double-quotes" and that fixed it! Thanks for the info! –  Xeoncross May 26 '11 at 22:51
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And is there a man page for it?

Yes, man bash see 3.6.6 and 3.6.7

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The cat <<EOF Bash syntax is very useful when you need to print multiline output to a file or a piped command.

Examples of usage

1. Printing multiline output to a file:

$ cat > test.sh << EOF
#!/bin/bash
echo TEST
echo $PATH
echo \$PATH
EOF

The content of test.sh will become:

#!/bin/bash
echo TEST
echo /home/testuser/
echo $PATH

2. Passing multiline output to a pipe:

$ cat | grep 'a' <<EOF
car
bus
truck
airplane
EOF

Will output:

car
airplane
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protected by Elenasys Dec 19 '13 at 21:40

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