Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I have a class that I want to be able to sort (ie support a less-than concept), and it has several data items such that I need to do lexicographic ordering then I need something like this:

struct MyData {
  string surname;
  string forename;

  bool operator<(const MyData& other) const {
    return surname < other.surname || (surname==other.surname && forename < other.forename); }
};

This becomes pretty unmanageable for anything with more than 2 data members. Are there any simpler ways of achieving it? The data members may be any Comparable class.

share|improve this question

tuple is a good idea, but if you want to keep having names for your member variables, it might be good enough to restructure your comparison function like this:

struct MyData {
    string surname;
    string forename;
    string var;
    // ...

    bool operator<(const MyData& other) const {
        if (surname != other.surname) return surname < other.surname;
        if (forename != other.forename) return forename < other.forename;
        if (var != other.var) return var < other.var;

        // ...

        return false; //< They are equal
    }
};

Depending on your taste, you might even want a macro like #define COMPARE(field) if (field != other.field) return field < other.field; to reduce duplication. Then the function would just become a list of COMPARE-invocations.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe #define LEX_LT(mem) if(mem != other.mem) return mem < other.mem and then chain them as LEX_LT(surname); LEX_LT(forename); LEX_LT(var); ...; return false; – kennytm Mar 23 '10 at 14:56
    
I like the layout of that, it's much more manageable and less error-prone than the nested-if. I'm not averse to occasional macro use, and that could be handy for larger structures, but I think the basic form is clear enough. – the_mandrill Mar 23 '10 at 15:01

You could store the data in a boost::tuple, which provides lexicographic comparison, and provide named accessor functions, along the lines of:

#include <boost/tuple/tuple.hpp>
#include <boost/tuple/tuple_comparison.hpp>

struct Data {
    string &surname()  {return stuff.get<0>();}
    string &forename() {return stuff.get<1>();}

    // it would be polite to add const overloads too.

    bool operator<(const Data &other) const {return stuff < other.stuff;}

private:
    boost::tuple<string, string> stuff;
};

I believe this is also available as std::tr1::tuple, and will be std::tuple in the forthcoming standard.

Maintaining the list of accessors is probably more manageable than maintaining the comparison code.

share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting solution. It seems a shame to lose the named fields though as seeing the class's contents in the debugger becomes more difficult. – the_mandrill Mar 23 '10 at 14:49
4  
You can keep the named fields and use the tuple only for comparison purposes, e.g return boost::tie(surname, forename) < boost::tie(other.surname, other.forename); – UncleBens Mar 23 '10 at 15:57
1  
Even better, wrap tie in a member function. Then you only have to maintain a single list of the lexicographical order. – Mike Seymour Mar 23 '10 at 16:03
    
Neat - I hadn't come across boost::tie() before – the_mandrill Mar 23 '10 at 16:29

If all members have the same type you could put them in std::vector. By default std::lexicographical_compare will be used to compare vectors.

share|improve this answer

You can use a boost::tuple or std::pair which has built-in lexigraphical comparison. Of course the disadvantage is you can't associate a method to the tuples.

share|improve this answer
up vote 2 down vote accepted

With the advent of C++11 there's a new and concise way to achieve this using std::tie:

bool operator<(const MyData& other) const {
  return std::tie(surname, forename) < std::tie(other.surname, other.forename);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.