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The task is to implement beautiful strategy design pattern with the java enum:

public enum MyEnum {

    FIRST {
        @Override
        public String doIt() {
            return "1: " + someField; //error
        }
    },
    SECOND {
        @Override
        public String doIt() {
            return "2: " + someField; //error
        }
    };

    private String someField;

    public abstract String doIt();

} 

but when referring to someField I get

Cannot make a static reference to the non-static field someField.

What is wrong and is it possible to do that better?

share|improve this question
    
try typing this.someField and see if it works, and also I think you need to initialize it with a constructor maybe. –  EpicPandaForce Jul 29 at 8:09
2  
That's very odd - I'm surprised that the override counts as a static context. Note that making the field protected removes the error, which is also odd... –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 at 8:09
1  
@Zhuinden: That changes the error to someField has private access in MyEnum –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 at 8:10
2  
So basically FIRST and SECOND can be regarded as static inner classes that override MyEnum? If you think that way it will explain why the compiler thinks someField as a static reference @JonSkeet is surprised about. And adding this will make it explicitly seek for the member in the base class, which changes the error to someField has private access in MyEnum. Am I right? P.S. And also it would explain why we can refer to enum values as MyEnum.FIRST in the code. –  Krumia Jul 29 at 8:59
1  
You can use ((MyEnum)this).someField to access the private field as an inner class can access private fields only if the instance has the outer class type. But of course, super.someField is shorter… See here –  Holger Jul 29 at 9:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

A specialized enum is nothing but a subclass with inner-class semantics. If you look at the byte code after compilation, you will notice that the compiler only inserts accessor method for reading a private field but any specialized enum is compiled as its own class. You can think about your enum as being implemented as:

public abstract class MyEnum {

  private static class First extends MyEnum {

    @Override
    public String doIt() {
        return "1: " + someField; //error
    }
  }

  private static class Second extends MyEnum {

    @Override
    public String doIt() {
        return "2: " + someField; //error
    }
  }

  public static final MyEnum FIRST = new First();
  public static final MyEnum SECOND = new Second();

  private String someField;

  public abstract String doIt();
} 

As you can see, the same compiler errors occur. Effectively, your problem does not relate to enums but to their inner-class semantics.

However, you found a borderline case of the compiler guessing the intend of your code and trying to warn you that what you intend is illegal. In general, the someField field is visible to any specialized enum. However, there are two ways of accessing the private field from an inner class and only one is legal:

  1. private members are not inherited. You can therefore not access a private field from this instance when it was defined in a super class.

  2. For inner classes, members of outer classes are accessible even if they are private. This is achieved by the compiler by inserting accessor methods to the outer classes which expose the private fields by accessor methods. A non-static field can only be accessed if the inner class is non-static. For enums, the inner classes are however always static.

The later condition is what the compiler complains about:

Cannot make a static reference to the non-static field someField

You are trying to access a non-static field from a static inner class. This is not possible even though the field would be technically visible because of the inner class semantics. You could instruct the compiler explicitly to access the value by reading it from the super class by for example:

public String doIt() {
  MyEnum thiz = this;
  return thiz.someField;
}

Now the compiler knows that you are trying to access a member of a visible (outer) type instead of erroneously accessing the someField field of the (non-static) outer class instance (which does not exist). (Similarly, you could write super.someField which expresses the same idea that you want to go down the inheritance chain and not access an outer instance's field.) The easier solution would however be to simply make the field protected. This way the compiler is happy about the inheritance visibility and compiles your original setup.

share|improve this answer
    
if thats the case how come: FIRST.someValue inside doIt() method is valid even if someValue is declared as private? –  eldjon Jul 29 at 9:21

If you make someField protected instead of private or use super.someField instead you will be able to access it.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't see anything wrong with it (in fact whoever downvoted has removed the downvote). That's really strange that super.someField works too. –  Tim B Jul 29 at 8:12
    
+0 Why does this solution work? –  Kevin Jul 29 at 18:40

someField is private, remove the private modifier or move it into your abstract classes.

share|improve this answer

Private fields are not accessible from subclasses which is exactly what you do when you implement the MyEnum.doIt() abstract method on a per-instance basis. Change it to protected, and it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Am I the only one for whom it's not obvious that this will make the enum be an abstract class without an abstract identifier and creating an implementation of the abstract method will implicitly subclass the original enum type? It makes sense, but it's not obvious at all at first glance. –  EpicPandaForce Jul 29 at 8:14
    
@Zhuinden that's a standard feature of Java enums and one of the things that makes them so powerful. It's not obvious but all the good Java enum tutorials/docs cover it. –  Tim B Jul 29 at 8:18

someField is a private variable when enums are static variables. You cant assign non static variable to static variable in this way.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but why does it work when you remove the private modifier? –  kocko Jul 29 at 8:12
    
You can use non-static variables in enums, if you use a private constructor to initialize them, for example public class MyEnum { FIRST("String"); private String myString; private MyEnum(String string) { this.string = string; } –  EpicPandaForce Jul 29 at 8:13
    
I do not know why would you want to restrict instantiation of the class @Zhuinden... It can be useful in singleton pattern when you want to restrict number of instances of that class... But in this case I would not agree with you –  Szymon Krawczyk Jul 29 at 9:45

Apparently the problem is that when you say:

public enum MyEnum {
    ...
    public abstract String doIt();
} 

It implicitly needs the enum to be an abstract "class", as you must provide an implementation for it. Therefore, when you say

FIRST {
    @Override
    public String doIt() {
        return "1: " + this.someField; //error
    }
}

It gives an error because you are trying to access the "base class" MyEnum's private field, and as it is private, it is not visible from the implicitly created anonymous subclass. As such, protected is visible from the subclass, therefore it fixes the problem.

There are some questions on Stack Overflow that talk about this problem, such as Singletons, Enums and anonymous inner classes or Why can I anonymously subclass an enum but not a final class? .

EDIT: Apparently not everything in this statement is correct, because while this.someField doesn't work as the field is not visible from the subclass, it is visible accessed as super.someField. This is a phenomenon I've not seen before, and will try to look into now.

share|improve this answer
    
Anonymous inner classes can see private fields. See stackoverflow.com/questions/25011061/… –  Tim B Jul 29 at 8:26
1  
The compiler tries to guess your intend. By writing super, you express to the compiler that you do not believe that the field was inherited such that it does not complain. See my answer below. –  raphw Jul 29 at 8:48

What you could do is the following:

public enum MyEnum {
    FIRST,SECOND;

    private String someField;

    public String doIt(){
        switch(this){
            case FIRST:  return "1: " + someField; break;
            case SECOND: return "2: " + someField; break;
        }
    }

}

This way, you still inherit Enum and you can use MyEnum.values() and other perks that come from deriving Enum.

share|improve this answer
1  
yeah but you miss out on the strategy pattern, also, what happens if there are 2 dozen enums? that's gonna be an ugly, unmaintainable switch quickly! –  edthethird Jul 29 at 19:26
    
@ed The accepted answer uses more code per enumeration and isn't a proper enum. It seems to me that that would be less maintainable than my solution. Using a switch allows you to utilize fall-through and you don't need to rewrite method headers. –  Zaq Jul 29 at 21:26
    
true, but with IDE autocompletion a lot of the boilerplate can be filled out with a right click. I mean I agree, it is verbose, but that's the nature of Java. Also, another "benefit" (in quotes because that's debatable) it that enums are actually compiled into objects, and not treated as primitives. So you can do stuff like this in Java, and not many other languages. –  edthethird Jul 30 at 14:55

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