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I know that this feature will be deprecated in C++0x, but for me as a total novice it seems like a good idea to have it. Could anyone explain to me why isn't a good idea?

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See stackoverflow.com/editing-help and stackoverflow.com/faq. This is not a forum. –  John Saunders Mar 23 '10 at 16:34
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@John Saunders: it is an open-ended but legitimate technical question. There are reasons why the feature is being removed from the C++ standard, and they can be explained without subjectivity or argumentativeness. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 23 '10 at 16:39
    
@Jonathan: why are you directing that at me? –  John Saunders Mar 23 '10 at 16:42
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@John Saunders: you might want to edit your comment to indicate that you were complaining about some irrelevant stuff that has since been edited out of the question (in its current form it's a fine question). –  Daniel Earwicker Mar 23 '10 at 16:44
    
@Daniel: @Jonathan: I did not downvote. The comment was meant for @atch, lacking any "private message" capability in SO. When I downvote, I say why. –  John Saunders Mar 23 '10 at 16:49
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Please see this detailed article by Herb Sutter. He has the most thorough explanation of the problems and short comings of their design.

A Pragmatic Look at Exception Specificiations

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"Here’s what many people think that exception specifications do: - Guarantee that functions will only throw listed exceptions (possibly none)." Pure nonsense. That exactly what they do. "Enable compiler optimizations based on the knowledge that only listed exceptions (possibly none) will be thrown." That what exception specifications can do, and some major compilers actually do that. –  curiousguy Nov 2 '11 at 20:56
    
@curiousguy did you read the full article? Based on your comment it sounds like you stopped after that sentence. –  JaredPar Nov 2 '11 at 20:59
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I can't believe C++0x was already underway in 2002. That was a long time coming! –  Mark Ransom Nov 2 '11 at 21:02
    
@MarkRansom I takes a lot of repetition of wrong, absurd, ridiculous statements before they become the "truth". –  curiousguy Nov 2 '11 at 21:06
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That may be the worst GoTW I have ever read. Every "problem" Herb identifies is self-inflicted by the language spec and could have been fixed trivially in the new spec... For example, if C++11 simply allowed exception specifications in typedefs and changed the behavior to "undefined" for throwing an invalid exception, 90% of that article would be irrelevant. –  Nemo Nov 2 '11 at 21:13
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As far as I understand it, an exception specification means:

I wan't you (the compiler) to generate extra code that makes sure that the exception is one of these types. If not call terminate please, we're toast. The extra checking would need to be put into the (implicit) exception handler (required to implement it) in every call.

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Review of http://www.gotw.ca/publications/mill22.htm

Issue the First: A “Shadow Type System”

True, minor technical point, and easy to fix.

Issue the Second: (Mis)understandings

Here’s what many people think that exception specifications do:

His first point:

  • Guarantee that functions will only throw listed exceptions (possibly none).

If this is what people think, it is very fine, because it is exactly what ES guarantee, by definition. Herb agrees in the same document:

(ES) Enforce at runtime that functions will only throw listed exceptions (possibly none).

His second point:

  • Enable compiler optimizations based on the knowledge that only listed exceptions (possibly none) will be thrown.

This is also absolutely correct.

He explains why this second point is an incorrect belief with an example:

// Example 1(b) reprise, and two
// potential white lies:
//
int Gunc() throw();    // will throw nothing (?)

int Hunc() throw(A,B); // can only throw A or B (?)

Are the comments correct? Not quite. Gunc() may indeed throw something, and Hunc() may well throw something other than A or B! The compiler just guarantees to beat them senseless if they do… oh, and to beat your program senseless too, most of the time.

Because Gunc() or Hunc() could indeed throw something they promised not to, not only can’t the compiler assume it won’t happen (...)

Herb latter remark that "(ES) Enforce at runtime that functions will only throw listed exceptions (possibly none)." refute this "argument" too.

Both of Herb's 2 main points are obviously, absolutely, indisputably wrong, according to him.

What else can I add?

I believe that words have fix meaning, that can't be changed at will, for the sake of the "argument".

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can anyone refute any point I make? Or I am being downvoted for contradicting the semi-God Herb Sutter? –  curiousguy Nov 26 '11 at 1:54
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Better question: Can you actually prove your points? You just say "this is like that, period.", which isn't very convincing. There's nothing wrong with contradicting someone. Both of Herb's 2 main points are obviously, absolutely, indisputably wrong.. Well, let's just assume it isn't as obvious to me as it is to you. Care to explain what exactly is so obvious? –  Xeo Nov 26 '11 at 5:37
    
@Xeo Which point is not obvious? –  curiousguy Nov 26 '11 at 6:07
    
Anyway, ask Herb. He pretty much agree with my points, and even writes that ES "Enforce at runtime that functions will only throw listed exceptions (possibly none)." Since the compiler enforce that only listed exception are thrown, it means it guaranteed that only listed exception. This is just what the language definition says anyway. It isn't like there is some room for argument - there is none. This obviously disprove his other point, that "Because Gunc() or Hunc() could indeed throw something they promised not to". –  curiousguy Nov 26 '11 at 6:26
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Note: I didn't downvote, and I don't understand them. That aside, there is a huge difference between guaranteeing something and enforcing something. It's a source of confusion because many people believe the former, while C++ only promises the latter. It's like the difference between "I guarantee you, that I'll never, ever steal something from you. If I try, I'll be shot." and "I guarantee you, that you'll never, ever notice I stole something from you, because by then you'll have been shot." (which is what happens in C++). –  Xeo Nov 26 '11 at 6:49
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