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I have a very big file with start and end positions, but here is a snippet:

(A)   11897   11976           
(B)   17024   18924         
(C)   25687  25709  

and another file with start and end positions (also a snippet):

(i) 3631 5899  
(ii) 11649 13714                                       
(iii) 23146 31227           

I would like to find out if values file 2 contained the start and end position of values in file 1 within their range.

The result file I would like to have would look like this:

(ii) 11649 18924 (A) 11897 11976      
(iii) 23145 31277 (C) 25687 25709          

I wrote a perl code:

open my $firstfile, '<', $ARGV[0] or die "$!";
open my $secondfile, '<', $ARGV[1] or die "$!";

while (<$firstfile>) {
    @col=split /\s+/;
    $start=$col[1];
    $end= $col[2];

    while (<$secondfile>) {
        @seccol=split /\s+/;
        $begin=$seccol[1];
        $finish=$seccol[2];     

        print join ("\t", @col, @seccol), "\n" if ($start>=$begin and $end<=$finish);
    }
}

but my result file only shows the first match, but none of the others:

(ii) 11649 18924 (A) 11897 11976 

Any advice?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think it's the solution but typo: $begin=$secol[1]; should be $seccol[1]. Yet another opportunity to tell someone to use strict; use warnings; at the top of their Perl script. – Tom Fenech Jul 29 '14 at 16:08
    
True, but it's just a typo from when I posted the question on here. Edited it now. – user3816990 Jul 29 '14 at 16:21
    
In terms of your files, how big is "very big"? – Tom Fenech Jul 29 '14 at 16:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Because you are using nested loops, the second file has been consumed entirely after the first iteration of the outer loop. Rather than re-reading the file, you could create an array containing the elements from the first file, then compare them with the second:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

open my $firstfile, '<', $ARGV[0];
open my $secondfile, '<', $ARGV[1];

my @range;

while (<$firstfile>) {
    push @range, [ split ];
}

while (<$secondfile>) {
    my @col = split;
    my @matches = grep {
        $$_[1] >= $col[1] && $$_[2] <= $col[2]
    } @range;

    if (@matches > 0) {
        for my $ref (@matches) {
            print join("\t", @$ref, @col), "\n";
        }
    }
}

@range is an array of references to the columns in your first file. Note that you don't need to specify any further arguments to split as it splits on whitespace by default.

In the second while loop, each column of the second file is compared against each of the sets of values referred to in the @range array. Any matches are stored in @matches. If the size of the array is greater than 0, each of the matches are printed out in the same format as you originally specified.

share|improve this answer

You need to rewind the second file each time, or (maybe preferably, depending on its size) load it into an array.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my ($start,$end,$begin,$finish);

open my $firstfile, '<', $ARGV[0] or die "$!";
open my $secondfile, '<', $ARGV[1] or die "$!";

while (<$firstfile>) {
        my @col=split /\s+/;
        $start=$col[1];
        $end= $col[2];

        seek($secondfile,0,0);
        while (<$secondfile>) {
           my @seccol=split /\s+/;
           $begin=$seccol[1];
           $finish=$seccol[2];
           print join ("\t", @col, @seccol), "\n" if ($start>=$begin and $end<=$finish);
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
could I ask why you put 0,0 after the command seek($secondfile)? – user3816990 Jul 30 '14 at 8:12
    
@user3816990 Sure. The first zero means "seek to position 0" and the second zero means "seek absolute" rather than "seek relatove to current position". So, it means seek to absolute zero - i.e. the start. perldoc.perl.org/functions/seek.html – Mark Setchell Jul 30 '14 at 8:29

Here is an alternate perl one-liner:

perl -lane '
BEGIN { 
    $x = pop;
    push @range, map[split], <>; 
    @ARGV = $x
}  
for (@range) {
    if ($F[1] <= $_->[1] && $F[2] >= $_->[2]) {
        print join " ", @F, @$_
    }
}' bigfile secondfile
(ii) 11649 13714 (A) 11897 11976
(iii) 23146 31227 (C) 25687 25709

Using the command line options:

  • -l removes the newline from each line and places it back during print
  • -a auto splits the line in to an array @F.
  • -n creates a while(<>){..} loop for processing each line
  • -e executes the code block
  • In the BEGIN block we iterate through the big file creating an array of array
  • In the main body we check the second column and third column is in the range and if so, we print the entire line and entire array of array content.
share|improve this answer
    
can I ask which file the @F array is being created for? – user3816990 Aug 4 '14 at 18:43
    
@user3816990 The @F array is being created for the second file using -a : autosplit option on the command line. The bigfile is split in the BEGIN block using the split function. – jaypal singh Aug 4 '14 at 19:24

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