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I am reading file character by character and i want to combine all those characters in one string named fullstr in my code.I need entire file in string form by combining all characters in one string.i have tried that by skipping \n. Here is my code.

module TreasureFile where
import System.IO   

main =  do 
        hdl <- openFile "map.txt" ReadMode
        readbychar hdl             

readbychar hdl =  do  t <- hIsEOF hdl
                      if t then return()                     
                        else do
                        x <- hGetChar hdl
                        if x =='\n' then return()
                         else do
                          let char = charToString x
                          let fullstr = makestr fullstr char  
                          readbychar hdl                         

charToString :: Char -> String
charToString c = [c]                     

makestr :: String->String->String
makestr c d =do

             let e=c ++ d
             return e                      
share|improve this question
1  
You can't use do notation without a monad (like IO). Your makestr should be just makestr c d = c ++ d – jozefg Jul 29 '14 at 18:23
    
can you please help me by correcting my code??i tried a lot..i need entire file in one string that what i am trying – Hiren Jul 29 '14 at 18:29

First of all, this won't typecheck. For one thing, you seem to be confused about the use of return. Some might say that this function is poorly named, since it seems to mimic the behavior of return in other languages, but in Haskell it's nothing more than a regular function. For example, you can do the following quite easily

x :: IO String
x = do
    return ()
    return 1
    return Nothing
    return False
    return "It worked"

And if you were to do

main :: IO ()
main = do
    s <- x
    putStrLn s

It would print It worked to the screen. In Haskell, return is nothing more than a constructor for monadic types. It takes a single value and wraps it in the appropriate monadic context depending on the type signature. So I could have also written

x :: Maybe String
x = do
    return ()
    return 1
    return Nothing
    return False
    return "It worked"

Then

main :: IO ()
main = do
    case x of
        Just s -> putStrLn s
        Nothing -> putStrLn "Never reached"

Notice that in this context, x is matched on just like any other pure value, rather than being treated as an IO action with the bind symbol <-.


The other problem is that you appear to be trying to modify fullstr at every iteration through your loop. In Haskell, values are immutable, you can not change them after they've been assigned. It could be said that Haskell has no variables, only names bound to values. Here, you're actually initializing fullstr recursively, with the expression

let fullstr = makestr fullstr char

And this computation will never finish, it gets stuck in an infinite recursive loop. Additionally, you're never returning fullstr anywhere, you're just assigning it then moving on to the next iteration of the loop in readbychar. You can solve this problem a lot more simply, if you want to read the first line of a file just use readFile:

main :: IO ()
main = do
    contents <- readFile "map.txt"
    let firstLine = takeWhile (/= '\n') contents
    putStrLn firstLine

If you want each line of the file in a list, you can just call lines on it:

main :: IO ()
main = do
    contents <- readFile "map.txt"
    let allLines = lines contents
    mapM_ putStrLn allLines        -- mapM_ is like map but for monadic functions
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this code ,it worked.I got my entire file in list form.thanks for that but can you help to get this file in only one string by eliminating \n\r main :: IO () main = do contents <- readFile "map.txt" let firstLine = lines contents print firstLine – Hiren Jul 29 '14 at 18:49
    
@Hiren You can use a combination of concat and lines for this. lines will split the entire string by newline sequences (including \r\n), and then concat simply joins a list of strings together end-to-end. – bheklilr Jul 29 '14 at 18:51
    
i completely agree with you that concat can join string but for that i have to iterate this variable named as all_lines in which all lines in list form.i need to combine it in one string .here is my code:ain :: IO () main = do contents <- readFile "map.txt" let all_lines = lines contents print all_lines this all_lines variable has each file line in list..please help to get this all line only in single string variable. – Hiren Jul 29 '14 at 19:00
    
@Hiren Simply do let all_lines = concat (lines contents), then putStrLn all_lines will print out the contents of the file sans newline characters – bheklilr Jul 29 '14 at 19:03
    
yeah..it worked..thanks a lot..thank you so much... – Hiren Jul 29 '14 at 19:06

This a already written as a library function hGetContents

You can use it like:

import System.IO (ReadMode, openFile, hGetContents)

main :: IO ()
main = do
    hdl <- openFile "map.txt" ReadMode
    cnts <- hGetContents hdl
    doSomethingWith cnts

doSomethingWith :: String -> IO ()
doSomethingWith = error "You didn't say what you wanted to do."

Eventually, you may want to avoid the semi-closed state. You might do that with:

import Control.Exception (bracket)
import System.IO (ReadMode, openFile, hGetContents, hClose)

safeDeinterleaveIO :: IO [a] -> IO [a]
safeDeinterleaveIO act = do
    interleaved <- act
    return $! length interleaved `seq` interleaved

main :: IO ()
main = do
    cnts <- bracket acquire release use
    doSomethingWith cnts
 where
    acquire = openFile "map.txt" ReadMode
    use = safeDeinterleaveIO . hGetContents
    release = hClose

Or, you might learn a streaming library like conduit, pipes, or io-streams.

share|improve this answer
    
okay..i will go through it.. – Hiren Jul 29 '14 at 19:34

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