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The use case is some what like this:

public class SomeClass: IClonable
 {
     // Some Code

     //Implementing interface method
     Public object Clone()
      {
        //Some Clonning Code
      }
 }

Now my question is "Why is it not possible to use "SomeClass(As it is derivd from objec)" as a return type of Clone() method if we consider the Funda's of Covariance and Contravariance.

Can somebody explain me the reason behind this implemementaion of Microsoft ????

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1  
If the 'IClonable' interface was writen before your code, how could the Clone method return specific types? The only guarentee we have is that whatever is returned by your implementation of Clone, will be derived from "Object". Since you have to adhere to the exact interface definition, you'll have to return what the interface said, being "Object". – Marvin Smit Mar 23 '10 at 17:49
    
Here i want that my implementation of Clone method should be able to return specific type not the IClonable's Clone() method when i am impleneting IClonable interface. But this is not allowed, we get a compilation error. So i want to know the reason, why the the concept of Covariance or Contravariance are not allowed for implementing an interface. – Amit Mar 24 '10 at 4:13
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A non-broken implementation of interface-implementation variance would have to be covariant in the return type and contravariant in the argument types.

For example:

public interface IFoo
{
    object Flurp(Array array);
}

public class GoodFoo : IFoo
{
    public int Flurp(Array array) { ... }
}

public class NiceFoo : IFoo
{
    public object Flurp(IEnumerable enumerable) { ... }
}

Both are legal under the "new" rules, right? But what about this:

public class QuestionableFoo : IFoo
{
    public double Flurp(Array array) { ... }
    public object Flurp(IEnumerable enumerable) { ... }
}

Kind of hard to tell which implicit implementation is better here. The first one is an exact match for the argument type, but not the return type. The second is an exact match for the return type, but not the argument type. I'm leaning toward the first, because whoever uses the IFoo interface can only ever give it an Array, but it's still not entirely clear.

And this isn't the worst, by far. What if we do this instead:

public class EvilFoo : IFoo
{
    public object Flurp(ICollection collection) { ... }
    public object Flurp(ICloneable cloneable) { ... }
}

Which one wins the prize? It's a perfectly valid overload, but ICollection and ICloneable have nothing to do with each other and Array implements both of them. I can't see an obvious solution here.

It only gets worse if we start adding overloads to the interface itself:

public interface ISuck
{
    Stream Munge(ArrayList list);
    Stream Munge(Hashtable ht);
    string Munge(NameValueCollection nvc);
    object Munge(IEnumerable enumerable);
}

public class HateHateHate : ISuck
{
    public FileStream Munge(ICollection collection);
    public NetworkStream Munge(IEnumerable enumerable);
    public MemoryStream Munge(Hashtable ht);
    public Stream Munge(ICloneable cloneable);
    public object Munge(object o);
    public Stream Munge(IDictionary dic);
}

Good luck trying to unravel this mystery without going insane.

Of course, all of this is moot if you assert that interface implementations should only support return-type variance and not argument-type variance. But almost everyone would consider such a half-implementation to be completely broken and start spamming bug reports, so I don't think that the C# team is going to do it.

I don't know if this is the official reason why it's not supported in C# today, but it should serve as a good example of the kind of "write-only" code that it could lead to, and part of the C# team's design philosophy is to try to prevent developers from writing awful code.

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Agree with you points Aaronaught. May be this is the reason microsoft has gone this way. – Amit Mar 24 '10 at 4:39
1  
I don't think most people would think that such a half-implementation is broken. C++ supports return type covariance but not formal parameter type contravariance. Eiffel supports return type covariance and formal parameter type covariance, which is quite strange. (Eiffel has an unusual approach to subtyping.) Sather supports both. I haven't seen a mass migration away from C++ to Sather as a result. – Eric Lippert Mar 26 '10 at 0:07
    
@Eric: I can't argue with any of that (although I might say that the reason people aren't flocking to Sather is because they've never heard of it :P), but in a language like C# that already supports argument-type contravariance as part of method group conversion variance, I think lacking that feature for interface implementation would definitely feel broken; as a rule, C# and the .NET Framework try pretty hard to be consistent. My two cents! – Aaronaught Mar 26 '10 at 0:29

Let me rephrase the question:

Languages such as C++ allow an overriding method to have a more specific return type than the overridden method. For example, if we have types

abstract class Enclosure {}
class Aquarium : Enclosure {}
abstract class Animal 
{
    public virtual Enclosure GetEnclosure();
}

then this is not legal in C# but the equivalent code would be legal in C++:

class Fish : Animal
{
    public override Aquarium GetEnclosure() { ... 

What is this feature of C++ called?

The feature is called "return type covariance". (As another answer points out, it would also be possible to support "formal parameter type contravariance", though C++ does not.)

Why is it not supported in C#?

As I've pointed out many times, we don't have to provide a reason why a feature is not supported; the default state of all features is "not supported". It's only when huge amounts of time and effort are put into making an implementation that a feature becomes supported. Rather, features that are implemented must have reasons for them, and darn good reasons at that considering how much it costs to make them.

That said, there are two big "points against" this feature that are the primary things preventing it from getting done.

  1. The CLR does not support it. In order to make this work we'd basically have to implement the exactly matching method and then make a helper method that calls it. It's doable but it gets to be messy.

  2. Anders thinks it is not a very good language feature. Anders is the Chief Architect and if he thinks it is a bad feature, odds are good its not going to get done. (Now, mind you, we thought that named and optional parameters was not worth the cost either, but that did eventually get done. Sometimes it becomes clear that you do have to grit your teeth and implement a feature that you don't really like the aesthetics of in order to satisfy a real-world demand.)

In short, there are certainly times when it would be useful, and this is a frequently requested feature. However, it's unlikely that we're going to do it. The benefit of the feature does not pay for its costs; it considerably complicates the semantic analysis of methods, and we have no really easy way to implement it.

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2  
So the obvious follow up question: "Why does Anders think return type covariance is a bad feature?" – LBushkin Mar 26 '10 at 14:07
1  
@LBushkin: next time you see him, ask him. :-) – Eric Lippert Mar 26 '10 at 14:16

You have to implement an interface's methods exactly as they are in the interface. ICloneable's Clone method returns an object, so your SomeClass must also return an object. You can, however, return a SomeClass instance in SomeClass's Clone method without any problem, but the method definition must match the interface:

public class SomeClass: IClonable
 {
     // Some Code

     //Implementing interface method
     Public object Clone()
      {
        SomeClass ret = new SomeClass();
        // copy date from this instance to ret
        return ret;
      }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
And that would be expected. With the new .NET 4 stuff around the corner with co/contra variance in/out listings, is it possible to do exactly what she is asking? – Nick Larsen Mar 23 '10 at 17:54

In terms of explaining the reasons behind C# decisions, Eric Lippert from Microsoft has written much explaining Contra/CoVariance in C#... here's the tag list from his blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/tags/Covariance+and+Contravariance/default.aspx

[Edit] Specific to your question, this might be the right post.. http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2007/10/26/covariance-and-contravariance-in-c-part-five-interface-variance.aspx

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Not quite. Those articles are about parameterized type variance. The question is about return type variance, which is different. – Eric Lippert Mar 25 '10 at 23:49

It looks like the kind of thing they could have used generics for, but it seems there is a good reason why they did not.

It is talked about here:

http://bytes.com/topic/c-sharp/answers/469671-generic-icloneable

Basically, a generic interface that would allow: public class MyClass : IClonable<MyClass>

would also allow: public class MyClass : IClonable<MyOtherClass>

which doesn’t really provide any benefit, and might confuse things.

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I would posit that IClonable<out T> would be a really good pattern, especially if it inherited ISelf<out T>, which in turn included a readonly "self" property of type T. In many cases, I would aver that types exposing a public clone method should not be inheritable, but should have a base type which is identical except for having a protected Clone method. In this way, "foo" and "derivedFoo" could both have non-clonable derivatives, but a routine could be written to accept both a CloneableFoo and a CloneableDerivedFoo (as both are ICloneable<Foo>). – supercat Aug 24 '11 at 18:30

According to the C# specification, you must use a method with an identical signature when overriding or implementing an interface method. Keep in mind that Microsoft does not own C#. Their C# compiler is simply their implementation of it. So why would the spec do things this way? I can only guess, but I suspect it was for ease of implementation.

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