Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some Ruby scripts that I use to automate some rsync tasks that can take a very long time to finish. I'm using popen to run a command:

def process(command)
  io = IO.popen(command) 
  output = io.read
  io.close 
  return output 
end

The command is executed by a get request in a Sinatra app:

get '/sync' do
  stream do |out|
    rsync_command = "rsync somedir" 
    out << process(rsync_command)
  end
end

Then I am accessing the output with an Ajax request on the front end:

$.get('/sync', function (data) {
 console.log(data);
});

Is it possible to display the shell output as it happens rather than only having it return at the end of the process?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

IO::popen:

Runs the specified command as a subprocess; the subprocess’s standard input and output will be connected to the returned IO object.

stdout is a file. You are telling ruby to read the whole file with the line io.read, therefore ruby has to wait until the end of file is reached to return the text, which happens when the other end closes the pipe, i.e. when the target program has finished executing. You don't have to read a file a whole file at a time, instead you can read a file line by line:

def process(command)
  IO.popen(command) do |io|
    io.each do |line|
      puts line
    end
  end
end

That tells ruby to read the file until it finds a newline, then return the text...over and over gain until the end of file is reached.

Here's a full example:

#my_prog.rb

text = ""

1.upto(10) do
  text << "."

  puts text
  STDOUT.flush

  sleep 1
end

...

def process(command)
  IO.popen(command) do |io|
    io.each do |line|
      puts line
    end
  end
end

my_command = 'ruby ./my_prog.rb'
process(my_command)

Note that unless the target program flushes the output, the output will be buffered, and therefore the text won't be available to be read until the buffer is filled (at which point the buffer will be flushed automatically) or the target program ends(at which point the buffer also will be flushed automatically). Instead of calling STDOUT.flush() repeatedly, you can just use the line STDOUT.sync = true at the top of your program. When sync is set to true, ruby won't buffer the output.

share|improve this answer
    
Using read is a very bad practice as it isn't scalable. Trying to read everything in a file can consume all available space and cause an app to crawl. On the other hand, line-by-line I/O is extremely fast and infinitely scalable. –  the Tin Man Jul 29 at 22:20
    
Relevancy to anything in this post or any other post at SO? –  7stud Jul 30 at 0:37
    
Relevancy: the OP wanted to do io.read. That isn't scalable. You said use io.each. That is scalable. It's something repeated on Stack Overflow often. It's called confirming and agreeing with what you said, which is completely relevant. –  the Tin Man Jul 30 at 16:00
IO.popen(command){ |f| puts f.lines.to_a }
share|improve this answer
    
Did you actually try it, e.g. with my sample program? Do you know that lines() is deprecated? Do you know how enumerators work? How can to_a() ever return when all the lines haven't been read? –  7stud Jul 30 at 20:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.