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Okay, so I've got a problem - and I'd love to have it fixed.

I am using my favourite way of setting up a simple header/content/footer layout. The problem is that any elements I add to the 'content' div of my layout can not be expanded to 100% in Internet Explorer (as far as I know, IE only). I understand there is no height declared to the 'content' element, but because of the style of its positioning (declaring an absolute top AND bottom), the element fills the desired area. (The content element has a background color defined so you can see that the div is in fact filling between both the header and the footer.)

So my problem is, since the div is clearly expanded between the two, why can't a child be set to 100% to fill that area? If anyone has any solutions, I'd love to hear them. (I'm looking for a solution that won't involve designing by an entire different layout.. or at least perhaps an explanation of why this is happening. I'm assuming at this point it's because of the lack of a height declaration -- but the div is expanded, so I don't get it!)

Here is the code as used on the page:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
    <meta name="robots" content="noindex" />
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>No 100% height on 'content' child div in IE</title>
    </head>
    <style>
    html, body {
     width:100%;
     height:100%;
     margin:0px;
     padding:0px;
    }
    body {
     position:relative;
    }
    #wrapper {
     position:absolute;
     top:0px;
     width:960px;
     height:100%;
     left:50%;
     margin-left:-480px;
    }
     #header{
      position:absolute;
      top:0px;
      left:0px;
      width:100%;
      height:200px;
      background-color:#999;
     }
     #content{
      position:absolute;
      top:100px;
      bottom:50px;
      left:0px;
      width:100%;
      background-color:#F7F7F7;
     }
      #content_1{
       width:200px;
       background-color:black;
       height:100%;
       float:left;
      }
     #footer{
      position:absolute;
      bottom:0px;
      left:0px;
      width:100%;
      height:50px;
      background-color:#999;
     }  
    </style>

    <body>
    <div id="wrapper">
     <div id="header">
        </div>
        <div id="content">
         <div id="content_1">
            </div>
        </div>
        <div id="footer">
        </div>
    </div>
    </body>
    </html>
share|improve this question
    
Seems to work in IE8 for me. When I flip on compatibility mode, I do see that the black sidebar is not the full height. –  Kevin Mar 23 '10 at 18:05
    
Can you givve a concrete example of the problem. What do you mean the child won't fill the area? What problem, specifically, are you observing? A picture or two might help. –  Cheeso Mar 23 '10 at 18:07
    
The code, and a link to a working example were included in the original post... –  Jay Are Mar 23 '10 at 18:35
    
I saw the page but nothing jumped out at me as a problem. –  Cheeso Mar 23 '10 at 20:28
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this:

#content_1{
width:200px;
background-color:black;
height:100%;
position: absolute;
}

IE 7 and below assign a value called "hasLayout" to elements that need positioning. Sometimes to work out little quirks like this you have to force an item to have a layout which in this case means setting its position to absolute.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow - That actually worked!!! On the site I was using this similar code on, the elements were floating, so I didn't think to absolute position them. You are my savior of the month Peter! Many thanks. (Man - I though the hasLayout days were over... guess I was wrong) PS - Is there a simple way to add hasLayout to a the div if it were floating? (just out of curiosity, as it's not necessary for what I need it for). –  Jay Are Mar 23 '10 at 18:32
    
My goto hasLayout style is always "zoom:1;" –  bmoeskau Mar 23 '10 at 18:37
    
Glad I could help! If I remember correctly there's several ways to trigger the hasLayout flag without actually changing anything on a div, but since most situations are so unique it would be hard to say exactly what would work if the div were floating. Once you know the name of the problem though its a lot easier to find an answer. –  Peter Mar 23 '10 at 19:09
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