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I have two classes Address and Employee as follows:

 public class Address
{
    public string AddressLine1 { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine2 { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public string Zip { get; set; }
}

   public class Employee
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string MiddleName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public Address EmployeeAddress { get; set; }
    }

I have two employee instances as follows:

    var emp1Address = new Address();
    emp1Address.AddressLine1 = "Microsoft Corporation";
    emp1Address.AddressLine2 = "One Microsoft Way";
    emp1Address.City = "Redmond";
    emp1Address.State = "WA";
    emp1Address.Zip = "98052-6399";

    var emp1 = new Employee();
    emp1.FirstName = "Bill";
    emp1.LastName = "Gates";
    emp1.EmployeeAddress = emp1Address;


    var emp2Address = new Address();
    emp2Address.AddressLine1 = "Gates Foundation";
    emp2Address.AddressLine2 = "One Microsoft Way";
    emp2Address.City = "Redmond";
    emp2Address.State = "WA";
    emp2Address.Zip = "98052-6399";

    var emp2 = new Employee();
    emp2.FirstName = "Melinda";
    emp2.LastName = "Gates";
    emp2.EmployeeAddress = emp2Address;

Now how can I write a method which compares these two employees and returns the list of properties which have different values. So in this example I would like the result to be FirstName and Address.AddressLine1 .

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1  
Why do you need to use reflection? –  Justin Niessner Mar 23 '10 at 18:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't necessarily need reflection to perform the comparison. You can write a comparer class that takes two instances of Employee or Address, and compares each field that should match. For any that don't match, you can add a string (or PropertyInfo) element to some list to return to the caller.

Whether you return a PropertyInfo, MemberInfo, or just a string depends on what the caller needs to do with the result. If you actually need to visit the fields that contain differences, the PropertyInfo/MemberInfo may be better - but to just report the differences a string is probaby sufficient.

The main value of reflection would be to write a general purpose object comparer that could take two instances of any kind of object and compare their public fields and properties. This helps avoid writing repetetive comparison code over and over - but that doesn't seem like the case you're in.

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Edit, made it match your classes Like LBushskin said, you do not hacve to do this. This is not the fastest way! Buy if you want, try this:

    public static List<PropertyInfo> GetDifferences(Employee test1, Employee test2)
    {
        List<PropertyInfo> differences = new List<PropertyInfo>();
        foreach (PropertyInfo property in test1.GetType().GetProperties())
        {
            object value1 = property.GetValue(test1, null);
            object value2 = property.GetValue(test2, null);
            if (!value1.Equals(value2))
            {
                differences.Add(property);
            }
        }
        return differences;
    }
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public IEnumerable<PropertyInfo> GetNotEqualsProperties(Employee emp1, Employee emp2)
{
    Type employeeType = typeof (Employee);
    var properies = employeeType.GetProperties();
    foreach (var property in properies)
        if(!property.GetValue(emp1, null).Equals(property.GetValue(emp2, null))) //TODO: check for null
            yield return property;
}

And for complex properties you have to override Equals method

public class Address
{
    public string AddressLine1 { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine2 { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public string Zip { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj as Address == null)
            return false;
        return ((Address) obj).AddressLine1.Equals(AddressLine1);
    }
}
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No need for reflection. Of course, this example is returning a string with the property names...if you need the actual PropertyInfo object, things would get a little more difficult, but not by much.

public static IEnumerable<string> DiffEmployees
    (Employee one, Employee two)
{
    if(one.FirstName != two.FirstName)
        yield return "FirstName";
    if(one.LastName != two.LastName)
        yield return "LastName";
    if(one.Address.AddressLine1 != two.Address.AddressLine1)
        yield return "Address.AddressLine1";

    // And so on.
}
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