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I have the following method:

    public void PutFile(string ID, Stream content)
    {
        try
        {
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o => putFileWorker(ID, content));
        }

        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            OnPutFileError(this, new ExceptionEventArgs { Exception = ex });
        }
    }

The putFileWorker method looks like this:

    private void putFileWorker(string ID, Stream content)
    {
        //Get bucket name:
        var bucketName = getBucketName(ID)
            .ToLower();

        //get file key
        var fileKey = getFileKey(ID);

        try
        {
            //if the bucket doesn't exist, create it
            if (!Amazon.S3.Util.AmazonS3Util.DoesS3BucketExist(bucketName, s3client))
                s3client.PutBucket(new PutBucketRequest { BucketName = bucketName, BucketRegion = S3Region.EU });

            PutObjectRequest request = new PutObjectRequest();
            request.WithBucketName(bucketName)
                .WithKey(fileKey)
                .WithInputStream(content);

            S3Response response = s3client.PutObject(request);
            var xx = response.Headers;

            OnPutFileCompleted(this, new ValueEventArgs { Value = ID });
        }

        catch (Exception e)
        {
            OnPutFileError(this, new ExceptionEventArgs { Exception = e });
        }
    }

I've created a little console app to test this. I wire up event handlers for the OnPutFileError and OnPutFileCompleted events.

If I call my PutFile method, and step into this, it gets to the "//if the bucket doesn't exist, create it" line, then exits. No exception, no errors, nothing. It doesn't complete (i've set breakpoints on my event handlers too) - it just exits.

If I run the same method without the ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem then it runs fine...

Am I missing something?

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Does it actually stop processing, or do you get a thread switch in your debug environment? Is your mainthread closing down? (this will Thread.Abort() all worker threads) –  Marvin Smit Mar 23 '10 at 18:19
    
well... it doesn't hit any breakpoints after the above mentioned line... it simply hits the end of the static void Main() method... –  Alex Mar 23 '10 at 18:30
    
i also implemented this - statichippo.com/archive/2009/11/09/… doing this: var async = new AsyncQueueManager(); async.Queue(o => putFileWorker(ID, content)); has same result! –  Alex Mar 23 '10 at 18:39
    
You realize that try/catch around QueueUserWorkItem will not catch exceptions occurring in the putFileWorker call, right? –  Judah Himango Mar 23 '10 at 19:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

ThreadPool threads are background threads (see the link). They will not keep your application running if the main thread exits.

Typically, in WinForms apps, this is not a problem, because the main UI thread calls Application.Run and starts processing events. For your console app, if your Main method doesn't wait for the work item to complete somehow, the main thread will queue the work item and then exit.

You could create a background thread yourself and set its IsBackground property to false. Or you could create a thread and call Thread.Join to wait for it to finish.

-- EDIT --

As suggested in the comments below, you could also use a ManualResetEvent, or even a custom synchronization class as suggested by Linik. The goal is to block the main thread until the the background threads have completed.

To use a ManualResetEvent, create it in your main thread and pass it in as an argument. (I'll assign it to a static variable here just for brevity.)

ManualResetEvent s_WaitEvent;

ManualResetEvent s_WaitEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false); // non-signaled 
// queue work item here
s_WaitEvent.WaitOne();

At the end of your worker thread, signal the event:

s_WaitEvent.Set();

Link's CountDownLatch is nice if you have many threads that must process before you can exit. You can also use separate ManualResetEvents for each thread and wait for them all to complete using WaitHandle.WaitAll(WaitHandle[]). (ManualResetEvent inherits from WaitHandle.)

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1  
He would want to set IsBackground=false to ensure it keeps running. –  Winston Smith Mar 23 '10 at 18:47
    
Corrected, thank you. –  Paul Williams Mar 23 '10 at 19:14
    
thanks, this is what is happening. Please could you elaborate on the IsBackground... what do i need to do? –  Alex Mar 23 '10 at 20:08
    
You probably don't want IsBackground. Consider instead, an explicit synchronization mechanism, like a ManualResetEvent. Set it at the end of your worker code, and wait on it (WaitOne()) in the main thread before exiting. –  Cheeso Mar 23 '10 at 20:26
    
Yes, a ManualResetEvent is another option, or some other thread synchronization method. Your application stays alive as long as there is at least one foreground thread running. The main thread is a foreground thread. By default, ThreadPool threads are background threads, so they will not stop the application from quitting. –  Paul Williams Mar 23 '10 at 20:42

Put a Console.ReadLine() in your Main thread to block it while you test your worker thread. This will keep main from exiting. Just hit enter when you're done.

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1  
Thread.Join is better, since it requires no user interaction. –  Winston Smith Mar 23 '10 at 18:48
    
You can't Thread.Join() a thread in the ThreadPool, or at least you shouldn't. –  Robert Davis Mar 23 '10 at 18:52
    
This might work for toy code, but if I'm a customer I'm going to be seriously pissed if the outcome of your program depends on when I hit enter! –  Billy ONeal Mar 23 '10 at 21:17
    
@BillyONeal The question is about testing his code in a toy console app. This answer helps him do that in the easiest way possible. This question is not about how to do that in the real world. –  Robert Davis Mar 24 '10 at 13:30

Use a CountDownLatch to force the main to wait for all of the threads that you have queued up:

public class CountDownLatch 
{
    private int m_remain;
    private EventWaitHandle m_event;

    public CountDownLatch (int count)
    {
        if (count < 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
        m_remain = count;
        m_event = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        if (m_remain == 0)
        {
            m_event.Set();
        }
    }

    public void Signal()
    {
        // The last thread to signal also sets the event.
        if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref m_remain) == 0)
            m_event.Set();
    }

    public void Wait()
    {
        m_event.WaitOne();
    }
}

In Main:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(numFiles);
    // 
    // ...
    // 
    putFileWorker("blah", streamContent);
    // 
    // ...
    // 

    // waits for all of the threads to signal
    latch.Wait();
}

In the worker method:

private void putFileWorker(string ID, Stream content)
{
    try
    {
        //Get bucket name:
        var bucketName = getBucketName(ID)
            .ToLower();

        //get file key
        var fileKey = getFileKey(ID);

        try
        {
            //if the bucket doesn't exist, create it
            if (!Amazon.S3.Util.AmazonS3Util.DoesS3BucketExist(bucketName, s3client))
                s3client.PutBucket(new PutBucketRequest { BucketName = bucketName, BucketRegion = S3Region.EU });

            //
            // ... 
            // 
        }

        catch (Exception e)
        {
            OnPutFileError(this, new ExceptionEventArgs { Exception = e });
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        latch.Signal();
    }
}
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