Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I want to know which jars are loaded by all the different running JVM's.

If I type "lsof -p $PID | grep jar >> /somefile" from the bash/command, it works beautifully! (replacing $PID with an actual process id). However, I would like to be able to do this from within a Java program. I would expect the following code to work but no file gets written:

public static void printCustomCommand(){
    String[] pids = {"pidof java"};
    String s;

    try {
        Process pidProcess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("pidof java");
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(pidProcess.getInputStream()));
        pids = br.readLine().split(" ");

        for (String pid : pids){
            String cmd = "lsof -p " + pid + " | grep jar >> /somepath/mydumpfile";
            Process p;
            p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd);
            System.out.println(p.waitFor());
        }

        //pids = new String(bo).split(" ");
    } catch (IOException e1) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e1.printStackTrace();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

When I print the p.waitFor() command, it returns a 1 always, meaning according to the API documentation "something is incorrect". http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Process.html#waitFor%28%29

share|improve this question
    
consider using ProcessBuilder instead – Jigar Joshi Jul 30 '14 at 6:40
1  
Read here too stackoverflow.com/questions/5928225/… – PeterMmm Jul 30 '14 at 6:52
    
PeterMmm thank you very much! Combined with cartridgemeadow answer I managed to fix it :) – Rens Groenveld Jul 30 '14 at 9:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue is that Runtime.exec() does not understand shell concepts such as "|". Try this:

public static void printCustomCommand(){
    String[] pids = {"pidof java"};
    String s;

try {
    Process pidProcess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("/bin/bash -c pidof java");
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(pidProcess.getInputStream()));
    pids = br.readLine().split(" ");

    for (String pid : pids){
        String cmd = "/bin/bash -c lsof -p " + pid + " | grep jar >> /somepath/mydumpfile";
        Process p;
        p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd);
        BufferedReader reader = 
        new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));

    String line = "";
    while((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.print(line + "\n");
    }

    p.waitFor();  
    }

    //pids = new String(bo).split(" ");
} catch (IOException e1) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e1.printStackTrace();
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}
}

The problem is that exec runs a binary directly without invoking the shell. The "|" character is only recognized by the shell. The "-c" tells the shell to run a single command, and passes the entire command as the single argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I'm on the right path now with your answer. Thank you! I had to change the first exec command back to "pidof java" or otherwise I'd got a nullpointer at br.readLine().split(" "); Now although I do get a lot of jars back, the command returns a different result to me (more than only jars, i.e. opendir: permission denied). I'm quite new to Linux, but I'm guessing it has something to do with other users working on the same server maybe? – Rens Groenveld Jul 30 '14 at 7:30
    
What I mean with, I get different results is that I get different results in Java than in just a shell :) – Rens Groenveld Jul 30 '14 at 7:30
    
Resolved it, my final solution would be to create a String array instead of one String. It was in PeterMmm's suggestion and works very nice. – Rens Groenveld Jul 30 '14 at 9:48

Isn't that

Process pidProcess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[]{"pidof","java"});

?

And you cannot use pipes (|) in the exec method. The exec executes commands (executables) but pipes is part of the/a shell.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.