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I have a list of objects. Each object has an integer quantity and a DateTime variable which contains a month and year value. I'd like to traverse the list and pad the list by adding missing months (with quantity 0) so that all consecutive months are represented in the list. What would be the best way to accomplish this?

Example: Original List

{ Jan10, 3 }, { Feb10, 4 }, { Apr10, 2 }, { May10, 2 }, { Aug10, 3 }, { Sep10, -3 }, { Oct10, 6 }, { Nov10, 3 }, { Dec10, 7 }, { Feb11, 3 }

New List

{ Jan10, 3 }, { Feb10, 4 }, {Mar10, 0}, { Apr10, 2 }, { May10, 2 }, { Jun10, 0 }, { Jul10, 0 } { Aug10, 3 }, { Sep10, -3 }, { Oct10, 6 }, { Nov10, 3 }, { Dec10, 7 }, { Jan11, 0 }, { Feb11, 3 }

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1  
How do you have a DateTime variable that contains a month and a year? The class has a field/property of type Date, that manages to not hold the day? Or, is it a string ("Apr10") field/property? –  Patrick Karcher Mar 23 '10 at 19:55
    
Is this list supposed to be a single day? –  JaredPar Mar 23 '10 at 20:10
    
@Addie Your example would probably be more clear to people if you used Jan2010 instead of Jan10, it looks like a bunch of people took that to mean the 10th of Janurary, despite you specifying month and year in your text. –  Tanzelax Mar 23 '10 at 20:13
    
This list is dynamic. The only significant part of the DateTime object is the month and year. The list will often include multiple years like Jan10, Feb10, Jan11, etc. I've also previously sorted the list by date. @Patrick the DateTime object will hold values other than the month and year, but I don't care about them and will not access those values. I wrote Apr10 as pseudocode representing a DateTime object with only the month and year being significant –  Addie Mar 23 '10 at 22:01
    
@JaredPar I don't understand your question. Can you clarify? The list is a collection of month/year DateTime objects along with an integer value indicating a quantity. –  Addie Mar 23 '10 at 22:03
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One possible algorithm is to keep track of the previous and current months. If the difference between previous and current is 1 month, append current to the result. If the difference is more than one month, add the missing months first, then afterwards copy the current month.

Foo prev = months.First();
List<Foo> result = new List<Foo> { prev };
foreach (Foo foo in months.Skip(1))
{
    DateTime month = prev.Month;
    while (true)
    {
        month = month.AddMonths(1);
        if (month >= foo.Month)
        {
            break;
        }
        result.Add(new Foo { Month = month, Count = 0 });
    }
    result.Add(foo);
    prev = foo;
}

Results:

01-01-2010 00:00:00: 3
01-02-2010 00:00:00: 4
01-03-2010 00:00:00: 0
01-04-2010 00:00:00: 2
01-05-2010 00:00:00: 2
01-06-2010 00:00:00: 0
01-07-2010 00:00:00: 0
01-08-2010 00:00:00: 3
01-09-2010 00:00:00: -3
01-10-2010 00:00:00: 6
01-11-2010 00:00:00: 3
01-12-2010 00:00:00: 7
01-01-2011 00:00:00: 0
01-02-2011 00:00:00: 3

Other code needed to make this compile:

class Foo
{
    public DateTime Month { get; set; }
    public int Count { get; set; }
}

List<Foo> months = new List<Foo>
{
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 1, 1), Count = 3 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 2, 1), Count = 4 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 4, 1), Count = 2 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 5, 1), Count = 2 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 8, 1), Count = 3 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 9, 1), Count = -3 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 10, 1), Count = 6 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 11, 1), Count = 3 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2010, 12, 1), Count = 7 },
    new Foo{ Month = new DateTime(2011, 2, 1), Count = 3 }
};

Note: For simplicity I haven't handled the case where the original list is empty but you should do this in production code.

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This works to spec, and is very simple, and would perform well. –  Patrick Karcher Mar 23 '10 at 20:13
    
+1 for works to spec. :p –  Tanzelax Mar 23 '10 at 20:15
    
THANKS Mark! Spot on. –  Addie Mar 23 '10 at 22:15
    
Actually even if it works to specs, there is no requirement to create new list of objects as you can traverse ordered list and return only new, missing objects using yield directive (details below) –  too Mar 24 '10 at 8:21
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Lets assume the structure is held as a List<Tuple<DateTime,int>>.

var oldList = GetTheStartList();
var map = oldList.ToDictionary(x => x.Item1.Month);

// Create an entry with 0 for every month 1-12 in this year 
// and reduce it to just the months which don't already 
// exist 
var missing = 
  Enumerable.Range(1,12)
  .Where(x => !map.ContainsKey(x))
  .Select(x => Tuple.Create(new DateTime(2010, x,0),0))

// Combine the missing list with the original list, sort by
// month 
var all = 
  oldList
  .Concat(missing)
  .OrderBy(x => x.Item1.Month)
  .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
He has Jan10 and Jan11 in the same list. –  Tanzelax Mar 23 '10 at 20:06
    
@Tanzelax, that looks like a typo, I'll add a comment to confirm –  JaredPar Mar 23 '10 at 20:08
    
Nah, he wants 14 elements in the final list, from jan 2010 to feb 2011 –  Tanzelax Mar 23 '10 at 20:10
    
Interestingly, just about everyone that posted a response missed that in his example. :p –  Tanzelax Mar 23 '10 at 20:10
    
@Tanzelax. Correct, I specifically need it to take into account multiple years. –  Addie Mar 23 '10 at 20:38
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var months = new [] { "Jan", "Feb", "Mar", ... };
var yourList = ...;
var result = months.Select(x => {
  var yourEntry = yourList.SingleOrDefault(y => y.Month = x);
  if (yourEntry != null) {
    return yourEntry;
  } else {
    return new ...;
  }
});
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If I am understand correctly with "DateTime" month:

    for (int i = 0; i < 12; i++)
        if (!original.Any(n => n.DateTimePropery.Month == i))
            original.Add(new MyClass {DateTimePropery = new DateTime(2010, i, 1), IntQuantity = 0});
    var sorted = original.OrderBy(n => n.DateTimePropery.Month);
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One way is to implement an IEqualityComparer<> of your object, then you can create a list of "filler" objects to add to your existing list using the "Except" extension method. Sort of like below

public class MyClass
{
    public DateTime MonthYear { get; set; }
    public int Quantity { get; set; }
}

public class MyClassEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<MyClass>
{
    #region IEqualityComparer<MyClass> Members

    public bool Equals(MyClass x, MyClass y)
    {
        return x.MonthYear == y.MonthYear;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(MyClass obj)
    {
        return obj.MonthYear.GetHashCode();
    }

    #endregion
}

And then you can do something like this

// let this be your real list of objects    
List<MyClass> myClasses = new List<MyClass>() 
{
    new MyClass () { MonthYear = new DateTime (2010,1,1), Quantity = 3},
    new MyClass() { MonthYear = new DateTime (2010,12,1), Quantity = 2}
};

List<MyClass> fillerClasses = new List<MyClass>();
for (int i = 1; i < 12; i++)
{
    MyClass filler = new MyClass() { Quantity = 0, MonthYear = new DateTime(2010, i, 1) };
    fillerClasses.Add(filler);
}

myClasses.AddRange(fillerClasses.Except(myClasses, new MyClassEqualityComparer()));
share|improve this answer
    
oh, similar with my solution :) –  Nagg Mar 23 '10 at 20:06
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Considering years, speed and extensibility it can be done as enumerable extension (possibly even using generic property selector). If dates are already truncated to month and list is ordered before FillMissing is executed, please consider this method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Tuple<DateTime, int>> FillMissing(this IEnumerable<Tuple<DateTime, int>> list)
    {
        if(list.Count() == 0)
            yield break;
        DateTime lastDate = list.First().Item1;
        foreach(var tuple in list)
        {
            lastDate = lastDate.AddMonths(1);
            while(lastDate < tuple.Item1)
            {
                yield return new Tuple<DateTime, int>(lastDate, 0);
                lastDate = lastDate.AddMonths(1);
            }
            yield return tuple;
            lastDate = tuple.Item1;
        }
    }
}

and in the example form:

    private List<Tuple<DateTime, int>> items = new List<Tuple<DateTime, int>>()
    {
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 1, 1), 3),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 2, 1), 4),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 4, 1), 2),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 5, 1), 2),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 8, 1), 3),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 9, 1), -3),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 10, 1), 6),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 11, 1), 3),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2010, 12, 1), 7),
        new Tuple<DateTime, int>(new DateTime(2011, 2, 1), 3)
    };

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        var list = items.FillMissing();
        foreach(var element in list)
        {
            textBox1.Text += Environment.NewLine + element.Item1.ToString() + " - " + element.Item2.ToString();
        }
    }

which will result in textbox containing:

2010-01-01 00:00:00 - 3
2010-02-01 00:00:00 - 4
2010-03-01 00:00:00 - 0
2010-04-01 00:00:00 - 2
2010-05-01 00:00:00 - 2
2010-06-01 00:00:00 - 0
2010-07-01 00:00:00 - 0
2010-08-01 00:00:00 - 3
2010-09-01 00:00:00 - -3
2010-10-01 00:00:00 - 6
2010-11-01 00:00:00 - 3
2010-12-01 00:00:00 - 7
2011-01-01 00:00:00 - 0
2011-02-01 00:00:00 - 3
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