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I have a query that returns one row. However, I want to invert the rows and columns, meaning show the rows as columns and columns as rows. I think the best way to do this is to use a pivot table, which I am no expert in.

Here is my simple query:

SELECT Period1, Period2, Period3
FROM GL.Actuals
WHERE Year = 2009 AND Account = '001-4000-50031'

Results (with headers):

Period1, Period2, Period3

612.58, 681.36, 676.42

I would like for the results to look like this:

Desired Results:

Period, Amount

Jan, 612.58

Feb, 681.36

Mar, 676.42

This is a simple example, but what I'm really after is a bit more comlex than this. I realize I could produce theses results by using several SELECT commands instead. I'm just hoping someone can shine some light on how to accomplish this with a Pivot Table or if there is yet a better way.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try something like this (tested on MSSQL2008):

DECLARE @Data TABLE(Period1 Decimal(5, 2), Period2 Decimal(5, 2), Period3 Decimal(5, 2))
INSERT @Data
VALUES (612.58, 681.36, 676.42)

SELECT Period, Amount
FROM (SELECT Period1 AS Jan, Period2 AS Feb, Period3 AS Mar FROM @Data) AS D
UNPIVOT (Amount FOR Period IN (Jan, Feb, Mar)) AS U

Update

Based on Jeff's comment, how about this:

DECLARE @Actuals TABLE(Account INT, [Year] INT, Period1 Decimal(5, 2), Period2 Decimal(5, 2), Period3 Decimal(5, 2))
INSERT @Actuals VALUES (1, 2010, 612.58, 681.36, 676.42)
INSERT @Actuals VALUES (1, 2009, 512.58, 581.36, 576.42)

SELECT Account, Period, Amount
FROM
(
    SELECT a.Account, a.Period1 AS Jan, a.Period2 AS Feb, a.Period3 AS Mar, a1.Period1 AS Jan1, a1.Period2 AS Feb1, a1.Period3 AS Mar1
    FROM @Actuals AS a
    LEFT OUTER JOIN @Actuals AS a1 ON a.Account = a1.Account AND a1.[Year] = a.[Year] - 1
    WHERE a.[Year] = 2010
) AS d
UNPIVOT (Amount FOR Period IN (Jan, Feb, Mar, Jan1, Feb1, Mar1)) AS u

or, with an explicit year column:

DECLARE @Actuals TABLE(Account INT, [Year] INT, Period1 Decimal(5, 2), Period2 Decimal(5, 2), Period3 Decimal(5, 2))
INSERT @Actuals VALUES (1, 2010, 612.58, 681.36, 676.42)
INSERT @Actuals VALUES (1, 2009, 512.58, 581.36, 576.42)

SELECT Account, [Year], Period, Amount
FROM
(
    SELECT a.Account, a.[Year], a.Period1 AS Jan, a.Period2 AS Feb, a.Period3 AS Mar
    FROM @Actuals AS a WHERE a.[Year] IN (2009, 2010)
) AS d
UNPIVOT (Amount FOR Period IN (Jan, Feb, Mar)) AS u
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great solution for the simple example I gave. However, if I need to include another column then I don't see how I can do it this way. See example below. I am doing the JOIN for the other column, but can't get it. SELECT Account, Period, [2010 Actual] FROM ( SELECT a.Account , a.Period1 AS Jan, a.Period2 AS Feb, a.Period3 AS Mar , a1.Period1 AS Jan1, a1.Period2 AS Feb1, a1.Period3 AS Mar1 FROM GL.Actuals a LEFT JOIN GL.Actuals a1 ON a1.Account = a.Account AND a1.Year = a.Year - 1 WHERE a.Year = 2010) AS d UNPIVOT ([2010 Actual] FOR Period IN (Jan, Feb, Mar)) AS u – Jeff Stock Mar 23 '10 at 21:21
    
Interesting, but not exactly what I'm after. In this case I need two amount columns, one for each year. – Jeff Stock Mar 24 '10 at 12:03
    
in that case, after the unpivot, apply a pivot like this: SELECT Account, Period, [2009], [2010] FROM (...) AS DP PIVOT (MAX(Amount) FOR [Year] IN ([2009], [2010])) AS P, where ... is the last unpivot from above. hope that helps :) – Adam Mar 25 '10 at 10:23

For a fixed set of fields, you can use a UNION of select statements, each statement fetching one of the fields. Standard SQL does not provide a way to transpose the result for a variable number of fields, e.g. select * from table.

If MSSQL has an extension which helps (like pivot), I don't know about it.

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1  
Now you do: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177410.aspx – Jordan Arron Mar 23 '10 at 21:00
    
Thanks, Alison. :) Is it part of some version of the SQL standard or an extension? – Tomislav Nakic-Alfirevic Mar 24 '10 at 9:44
1  
Pivote tables are part of Transact-SQL, which is unique to SQL Server 2005 and 2008. – Jeff Stock Mar 24 '10 at 12:05

Check the unnest function, its quite amazing with little overhead. Just add a select query on top of the nested select query and unnest at that point:

SELECT id,
   unnest(array['a', 'b', 'c']) AS colname,
   unnest(array[a, b, c]) AS thing
FROM foo
ORDER BY id;
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