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I want to iterate through all (at least the 16 bit) unicode characters and print them on the screen with C.

I know there are related questions on SO but they don't solve the problem with printf in C, but this is what I want to achieve, if it's possible after all. I think it should be possible maybe with a trick I'm not aware of.

Since I want to use printf, I thought about something like this:

for (int i = 0x0000; i <= 0xffff; i++) {

    //then somehow increment the string
    char str[] = "\u25A1\n";
    printf("%s", str);

    char str[] = "\u25A2\n";
    printf("%s", str);

    char str[] = "\u25A3\n";
    printf("%s", str);

    ...

}

But it's a bit of a problem to increment the unicode code point, here \u25A1. I'm aware it's not possible per se because some characters like \u0000 are not printable and the compiler says no. But apart from that, how could I increment from hexadecimal 0000 to ffff and print the character with printf.

share|improve this question
    
\u0000 is not printable by standard C string functions because it's a 0 character. What compiler are you using? char str[] = "\u25A1\n"; does not look like standard C. – Jongware Jul 30 '14 at 9:45
2  
@Jongware Unicode escape sequences were added in C11. – ecatmur Jul 30 '14 at 9:46
2  
What's a character, anyway? Is अ a character? Is ऄ a character? Do you want programmer-perceived or user-perceived characters? Do you want initial/medial/final/isolate forms for positional characters? What representation do you want for combining marks? – ninjalj Jul 30 '14 at 11:00
    
@ninjalj You can find a list of all unicode characters here. – JohnnyFromBF Jul 30 '14 at 11:13
2  
What appears in that chart may have little resemblance to what appears in context in real text. Some characters have positional forms, depending on their position inside a word. Other characters ligate, e.g: the character for a syllable in indic scripts may be a ligature of several consonants, plus dependant vowels and assorted marks, ... There are also characters that affect text directionality (LRI, RLI, PDI, ...). – ninjalj Jul 30 '14 at 11:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If the __STDC_ISO_10646__ macro is defined, wide characters correspond to Unicode codepoints. So, assuming a locale that can represent the characters you are interested in, you can just printf() wide characters via the %lc format conversion:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>

#ifndef __STDC_ISO_10646__
#error "Oops, our wide chars are not Unicode codepoints, sorry!"
#endif
int main()
{
        int i;
        setlocale(LC_ALL, "");

        for (i = 0; i < 0xffff; i++) {
                printf("%x - %lc\n", i, i);
        }

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I wanted, it even works without the macro on my linux box. – JohnnyFromBF Jul 30 '14 at 17:26

In C99, you can use wide character to multibyte character conversion functions wctomb() or wcrtomb() to convert each code point to a local representation, using the current character set. (The code points are in the current character set, not Unicode.) Remember to use setlocale() to ensure conversion functions are aware of the user locale (most importantly, the current character set used). The conversion functions use the LC_CTYPE category, but you should still use setlocale(LC_ALL, ""); as for any other locale-aware program.

(Not all systems have the C.UTF-8 locale installed, so I do not recommend trying to override the locale to the standard C with UTF-8 using setlocale(LC_ALL, "C.UTF-8");. It works on some systems, but not all. AFAIK it does not work in Fedora-based Linux distributions, for example.)

Because you want to output all Unicode code points, I suggest a different approach: Use one of the Universal Character Set Transformation Formats, i.e. UTF-8, UTF-16 (UCS-2 was superseded by UTF-16 in 1996), or UTF-32 (also known as UCS-4). UTF-8 is the one most often used on the Web -- in particular, on this very web page you're looking at right now -- and is very easy to use.

For further reading on why you should prefer UTF-8 over "native wide strings", see utf8everywhere.org.

If you want truly portable code, you can use this header file, utf8.h, to convert UTF-8 to unicode code points (utf8_to_code()) and Unicode code points to UTF-8 (code_to_utf8()):

#ifndef   UTF8_H
#define   UTF8_H
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>

#define   UTF8_MAXLEN 6

static size_t utf8_to_code(const unsigned char *const buffer, unsigned int *const codeptr)
{
    if (!buffer) {
        errno = EINVAL;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer == 0U) {
        errno = 0;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer < 128U) {
        if (codeptr)
            *codeptr = buffer[0];
        return 1;
    }

    if (*buffer < 192U) {
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer < 224U) {
        if (buffer[1] >= 128U && buffer[1] < 192U)
            return ((buffer[0] - 192U) << 6U)
                 |  (buffer[1] - 128U);
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer < 240U) {
        if (buffer[1] >= 128U && buffer[1] < 192U &&
            buffer[2] >= 128U && buffer[2] < 192U)
            return ((buffer[0] - 224U) << 12U)
                 | ((buffer[1] - 128U) << 6U)
                 |  (buffer[2] - 128U);
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer < 248U) {
        if (buffer[1] >= 128U && buffer[1] < 192U &&
            buffer[2] >= 128U && buffer[2] < 192U &&
            buffer[3] >= 128U && buffer[3] < 192U)
            return ((buffer[0] - 240U) << 18U)
                 | ((buffer[1] - 128U) << 12U)
                 | ((buffer[2] - 128U) << 6U)
                 |  (buffer[3] - 128U);
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer < 252U) {
        if (buffer[1] >= 128U && buffer[1] < 192U &&
            buffer[2] >= 128U && buffer[2] < 192U &&
            buffer[3] >= 128U && buffer[3] < 192U &&
            buffer[4] >= 128U && buffer[4] < 192U)
            return ((buffer[0] - 248U) << 24U)
                 | ((buffer[1] - 128U) << 18U)
                 | ((buffer[2] - 128U) << 12U)
                 | ((buffer[3] - 128U) << 6U)
                 |  (buffer[4] - 128U);
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return 0;
    }

    if (*buffer < 254U) {
        if (buffer[1] >= 128U && buffer[1] < 192U &&
            buffer[2] >= 128U && buffer[2] < 192U &&
            buffer[3] >= 128U && buffer[3] < 192U &&
            buffer[4] >= 128U && buffer[4] < 192U &&
            buffer[5] >= 128U && buffer[5] < 192U)
            return ((buffer[0] - 252U) << 30U)
                 | ((buffer[1] - 128U) << 24U)
                 | ((buffer[2] - 128U) << 18U)
                 | ((buffer[3] - 128U) << 12U)
                 | ((buffer[4] - 128U) << 6U)
                 |  (buffer[5] - 128U);
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return 0;
    }

    errno = EILSEQ;
    return 0;
}

static size_t code_to_utf8(unsigned char *const buffer, const unsigned int code)
{
    if (code < 128U) {
        buffer[0] = code;
        return 1;
    }
    if (code < 2048U) {
        buffer[0] = 0xC0U | (code >> 6U);
        buffer[1] = 0x80U | (code & 0x3FU);
        return 2;
    }
    if (code < 65536) {
        buffer[0] = 0xE0U | (code >> 12U);
        buffer[1] = 0x80U | ((code >> 6U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[2] = 0x80U | (code & 0x3FU);
        return 3;
    }
    if (code < 2097152U) {
        buffer[0] = 0xF0U | (code >> 18U);
        buffer[1] = 0x80U | ((code >> 12U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[2] = 0x80U | ((code >> 6U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[3] = 0x80U | (code & 0x3FU);
        return 4;
    }
    if (code < 67108864U) {
        buffer[0] = 0xF8U | (code >> 24U);
        buffer[1] = 0x80U | ((code >> 18U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[2] = 0x80U | ((code >> 12U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[3] = 0x80U | ((code >> 6U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[4] = 0x80U | (code & 0x3FU);
        return 5;
    }
    if (code <= 2147483647U) {
        buffer[0] = 0xFCU | (code >> 30U);
        buffer[1] = 0x80U | ((code >> 24U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[2] = 0x80U | ((code >> 18U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[3] = 0x80U | ((code >> 12U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[4] = 0x80U | ((code >> 6U) & 0x3FU);
        buffer[5] = 0x80U | (code & 0x3FU);
        return 6;
    }
    errno = EINVAL;
    return 0;
}

#endif /* UTF8_H */

It is not fast, but it should be easy to understand, and supports all possible Unicode code points (U+0000 to U+10FFFF, inclusive), on all systems with at least 32-bit unsigned ints. On systems with 16-bit unsigned ints, your compiler may warn about unreachable code, and it'll only support the first 65536 code points (U+0000 to U+FFFF).

Using above utf8.h, you can easily write a C program that outputs a HTML page containing the Unicode characters you want (excluding control characters U+0000-U+001F and U+007F-U+00BF, inclusive, and invalid code points U+D800-U+DFFF, inclusive). For example, page.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include "utf8.h"

int main(void)
{
    unsigned char  ch[UTF8_MAXLEN + 1];
    unsigned int   i;
    const char    *str;
    size_t         n, len;

    /* HTML5 DOCTYPE */
    printf("<!DOCTYPE html>\n");
    printf("<html>\n");

    /* Header part. */
    printf(" <head>\n");
    printf("  <title> Unicode character list </title>\n");
    printf("  <meta http-equiv=\"Content-Type\" content=\"text/html; charset=UTF-8\">\n");
    printf("  <style type=\"text/css\">\n");
    /* with internal CSS stylesheet: */
    printf("   html {\n");
    printf("    font-family: \"DejaVu Mono\", \"Courier New\", \"Courier\", monospace;\n");
    printf("    font-weight: normal;\n");
    printf("    font-size: 100%%;\n");
    printf("    text-decoration: none;\n");
    printf("    background: #f7f7f7;\n");
    printf("    color: #000000;\n");
    printf("    padding: 0 0 0 0;\n");
    printf("    border: 0 none;\n");
    printf("    margin: 0 0 0 0\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("   body {\n");
    printf("    background: #ffffff;\n");
    printf("    padding: 0.5em 1em 0.5em 1em;\n");
    printf("    border: 1px solid #cccccc;\n");
    printf("    margin: 0 auto auto auto;\n");
    printf("    width: 12em;\n");
    printf("    text-align: center;\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("   p {\n");
    printf("    padding: 0 0 0 0;\n");
    printf("    border: 0 none;\n");
    printf("    margin: 0 0 0 0;\n");
    printf("    outline: 0 none;\n");
    printf("    text-align: center;\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("   p.odd {\n");
    printf("    background: #efefef;\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("   p.even {\n");
    printf("    background: #f7f7f7;\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("   span.code {\n");
    printf("    width: 8em;\n");
    printf("    text-align: right;\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("   span.char {\n");
    printf("    width: 4em;\n");
    printf("    text-align: left;\n");
    printf("   }\n");

    printf("  </style>\n");
    printf(" </head>\n");

    /* Body part. */
    printf(" <body>\n");

    n = 0;
    for (i = 0U; i <= 0xFFFFU; i++) {

        /* Skip Unicode control characters. */
        if ((i >= 0U && i <= 31U) ||
            (i >= 127U && i <= 159U))
            continue;

        /* Skip invalid Unicode code points. */
        if (i >= 0xD800U && i <= 0xDFFFU)
            continue;

        len = code_to_utf8(ch, i);
        if (len > 0) {
            ch[len] = '\0';

            /* HTML does not like " & < > */
            if (i == 32U)
                str = "&nbsp;";
            else
            if (i == 34U)
                str = "&#34;";
            else
            if (i == 38U)
                str = "&amp;";
            else
            if (i == 60U)
                str = "&lt;";
            else
            if (i == 62U)
                str = "&gt;";
            else
                str = (const char *)ch;

            if (n & 1) {
            printf("  <p class=\"odd\" title=\"%u in decimal, &amp;#%u; = %s\">", i, i, str);
                printf("<span class=\"code\">U+%04X</span>", i);
                printf(" <span class=\"char\">%s</span>", str);
                printf("</p>\n");
            } else {
                printf("  <p class=\"even\" title=\"%u in decimal, &amp;#%u; = %s\">", i, i, str);
                printf("<span class=\"code\">U+%04X</span>", i);
                printf(" <span class=\"char\">%s</span>", str);
                printf("</p>\n");
            }

            n++;
        }
    }

    printf(" </body>\n");
    printf("</html>\n");

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Redirect the output to a file, and you can open the file in whatever browser you prefer. If your browser is sane, and does not treat local files any different to those it obtains from a web server, then you should see the correct output.

(If you see multiple characters per code point after U+00A0, your browser has decided that because the file is local, it is using a different character set that it explicitly states it uses. Switch to a sane browser if that happens, or override the character set selection.)

If you want, you can just print the codes out as UTF-8 text, say using text.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include "utf8.h"

int main(void)
{
    unsigned char  ch[UTF8_MAXLEN + 1];
    unsigned int   i;
    size_t         len;

    for (i = 0U; i <= 0xFFFFU; i++) {

        /* Skip Unicode control characters. */
        if ((i >= 0U && i <= 31U) ||
            (i >= 127U && i <= 159U))
            continue;

        /* Skip invalid Unicode code points. */
        if (i >= 0xD800U && i <= 0xDFFFU)
            continue;

        len = code_to_utf8(ch, i);
        if (len > 0) {
            ch[len] = '\0';
            printf("U+%04X %s \n", i, ch);
        }
    }

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

but then you must either be sure your terminal or terminal emulator supports UTF-8 and uses an UTF-8 locale, or you redirect the output to a text file and open that file in an editor which either assumes the file uses UTF-8 or lets you explicitly select the UTF-8 character set.

Note that there is a space before and after each character. Because some of the code points are combining characters, they may not show up at all unless they can be combined with another character, and most (all?) combine with space just fine.

If you use Windows, then you must conform to Microsoft stupidity, and add a special "byte order mark" -- printf("\xEF\xBB\xBF"); -- to the beginning of the output, so that its utilities like Notepad recognizes the file as UTF-8. It's a Windows-only wart, and treat it as such.

Questions?

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, thanks for that. Though a little bit too much for my purpose, but very neat indeed. – JohnnyFromBF Jul 30 '14 at 17:30

The function to convert a 16-bit Unicode codepoint to a multibyte character sequence is c16rtomb; there is also c32rtomb if you want to handle 32-bit codepoints:

#include <uchar.h>

mbstate_t ps;
char buf[MB_CUR_MAX];
size_t bytes = c16rtomb(buf, i, &ps);
if (bytes != (size_t) -1) {
  printf("%.*s\n", bytes, buf);
}

If c16rtomb is not available you will need to use platform-specific facilities.

share|improve this answer

I would go for something like this (using raw UTF-8 encoding):

char unicode[3] = { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 };
for(size_t i=0; i<0xffff; i++)
{
    printf("%s\n", unicode);
    uint16_t * code = &unicode[0];
    *code = *code +1;
}
  • Define a string on 3 bytes, the last one is the NULL terminating byte allowing a display via printf
  • Consider the two first bytes as your 16-bit unicode and increment it on each loop

Of course it can be optimized as:

  • Many characters won't be displayable
  • The cast char* -> uint16_t is not very elegant (triggers a warning)
  • As there is 2 bytes for UTF-8 encoding it will actually browse 11 bits of codepoints. To get the 16 bits you might want to actually use uint32_t and define a 5 bytes char* buffer

[EDIT] As stated in the comment, this loop will actually generates a lot of invalid UTF-8 sequences. Indeed, going from U+007F to U+0080 is a +1 for code points but in UTF-8 you jump from 0x7F to 0xC280: you need to exclude some ranges in the loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
There is no guarantee that unicode is properly aligned for a uint16_t, so the assignment code = &unicode[0] and subsequent use of code causes undefined behaviour. On some implementations, the program might crash with a bus error. – Nisse Engström Jul 30 '14 at 10:18
1  
UTF8 is not encoded in shorts, you are thinking of UTF16. (And it would not use the multi-byte UTF-like encoding anyway.) – Jongware Jul 30 '14 at 10:57
    
@NisseEngström What do you mean by "properly aligned for an uint16_t ? Can't you guarantee that fixing the limits in the loop ? @Jongware No indeed, it is encoded in bytes but to get the code points > 0x80 you need multi-bytes on UTF-8 right ? And you might need multi-byte in UTF-16 for unicode > 0xFFFF no ? – Coconop Jul 30 '14 at 12:05
    
Yes, you need multi-byte codes for values above 0x7F. You are just adding 1 to the short, and that in itself has nothing to do with multi-byte encoding. – Jongware Jul 30 '14 at 13:22
1  
I finally understood ^^ The problem is that it will work only on some ranges, I actually will generate a lot of invalid UTF-8 sequences... – Coconop Jul 30 '14 at 13:45

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