Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My goal: the user clicks a button. From the button pops up a two-level menu. The user clicks on something, and this triggers a callback which does stuff.

Here is a minimal example:

import wx

class MyApp(wx.App):
    def OnInit(self):
        frame = TestFrame(None, -1, "Hello from wxPython")
        frame.Show(True)
        self.SetTopWindow(frame)
        return True

class TestFrame(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kw):
        wx.Frame.__init__(self, *args, **kw)

        sizer = wx.BoxSizer()
        button = wx.Button(self, label='Click me')
        sizer.Add(button)
        self.SetSizerAndFit(sizer)

        mainmenu = wx.Menu()
        next_id = 1000000
        submenus = {}

        for title in ['Submenu 1', 'Submenu 2', 'Submenu 3']:
            mit = wx.MenuItem(mainmenu, id=next_id, text=title)
            submenu = wx.Menu()
            mit.SetSubMenu(submenu)
            mainmenu.AppendItem(mit)

            next_id = next_id + 1
            submenus[title] = submenu

        items = [('Submenu 1', 'foo'),
                 ('Submenu 1', 'bar'),
                 ('Submenu 2', 'one'),
                 ('Submenu 2', 'two'),
                 ('Submenu 2', 'three'),
                 ('Submenu 3', 'zif'),
                 ('Submenu 3', 'zaf')]

        for title, item in items:
            submenu = submenus[title]
            mit = wx.MenuItem(submenu, id=next_id, text=item)
            submenu.AppendItem(mit)
            next_id = next_id + 1

            def callback(e, title=title, item=item):
                print 'Item clicked: %s, %s' % (title, item)

            self.Bind(wx.EVT_MENU, callback, mit)


        def show(e):
            self.PopupMenu(mainmenu, button.GetPosition())
        button.Bind(wx.EVT_BUTTON, show)

app = MyApp(0)
app.MainLoop()

Also:

Python 2.5.1 (r251:54863, Apr 18 2007, 08:51:08) [MSC v.1310 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import wx
>>> wx.version()
'2.8.10.1 (msw-unicode)'
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are handling ID generation yourself and in doing that mixing up IDs, anyway you do not need to generate IDs yourself use wx.NewId(), if you replace next_id with that it will work e.g.

mit = wx.MenuItem(submenu, id=wx.NewId(), text=item)
share|improve this answer
    
As easy as that. Huh. I don't like handling my own ID generation, but I concluded that I needed to for menu items (I don't remember why..). Everywhere else I omit the id= parameter. I didn't know about wx.NextId(). –  John Fouhy Mar 24 '10 at 5:05
    
Ah, I remember. It's because a MenuItem with an id of -1 is a separator. –  John Fouhy Mar 26 '10 at 5:08
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.