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Is there any problem mixing two types of modules in TypeScript? I mean something like follow:

/// <reference path="./FirstModule.ts" />

import SecondModule = require("./SecondModule");

class MainClass extends SecondModule
{
    private fm : FirstModule;

    constructor() {
        this.fm = new FirstModule();
    }
}
export = MainClass;

I'm having complicated problems with my TypeScript code and I'm not sure if this is the root. My problem is that while the compiler gives out no error, at run time the FirstModule is not recognized. I'm using PhpStorm and I can see that it tries to compile my code without any --out option. Here's the command:

/usr/local/bin/tsc --sourcemap MainClass.ts --module amd

Is the --out option needed here?

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1  
I'm not so sure, but I think you just need to require FirstModule similarly to how you've required SecondModule. –  David Sherret Jul 30 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ideally, you don't want to mix and match internal and external modules.

The easiest solution is to use external modules throughout (so remove module FirstModule from the FirstModule.ts file and import it just like the second module).

import FirstModule = require("./FirstModule.ts");

import SecondModule = require("./SecondModule");

class MainClass extends SecondModule
{
    private fm : FirstModule;

    constructor() {
        this.fm = new FirstModule();
    }
}
export = MainClass;
share|improve this answer
    
I did that but is there any reason why? There's no text on this or at least I couldn't find any. –  Mehran Jul 30 at 19:08
    
Internal modules are singleton instances, whereas external modules are loaded and executed on demand. It is not possible to generate JavaScript that would satisfy both of these styles, which is why it is hard to mix them. –  Steve Fenton Jul 30 at 19:13
    
External modules are singletons as well –  basarat Jul 30 at 22:41
    
Not in JavaScript terms - unless your module loader does something special there is every chance that you will have multiple instances when the same module is imported in different places in your application. –  Steve Fenton Jul 30 at 22:49
    
there is every chance that you will have multiple instances when the same module is imported in different places in your application. Its the same javascript object returned everytime you do a require call. Both amd and commonjs. Otherwise the application would be much slower. –  basarat Jul 31 at 0:01

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