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I have a global int array declared in a header file (Uni.h) like so :

int durationArray[];

My program will run and assign elements to the array (2 in this case). But what stumps me is that at the array elements yield different values if i use a for loop to display them and when I manually use cout to display them. Here is my code :

cout << "durationArray at element 0 is :" << durationArray[0] << endl;
cout << "durationArray at element 1 is :" << durationArray[1] << endl;

int counting=2;             
for (int i=0; i<counting; i++)
{
    cout << "durationArray at element " << i << ": " << durationArray[i] << endl;
}

Here is the output :

durationArray at element 0 is :3
durationArray at element 1 is :4


durationArray at element 0: 0
durationArray at element 1: 4

My ultimate aim is to get the sum of the array elements. But how do I accomplish this if the element values are wrong when i iterate through the array using a for loop? I plan to use this code for the addition :

for (int i=0; i<counting; i++)
    {
        sumofDuration+=durationArray[i];
    } 
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3  
I can't reproduce. –  0x499602D2 Jul 30 at 16:18
4  
Use std::accumulate to sum elements, not a loop. The loop isn't wrong, but it's not idiomatic and it's not as immediately clear that a summation is being done. –  chris Jul 30 at 16:18
3  
Reverse the blocks (do the manual accessing after the loops). Are the results the same? Are you sure you're not doing something to overwrite the array? –  James Curran Jul 30 at 16:20
1  
How is the array defined and initialized? –  James Curran Jul 30 at 16:22
    
Where is definition of that array? –  Ivan Lebediev Jul 30 at 16:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use std::accumulate , it is that simple :

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int main() {
  auto array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
  std::cout << std::accumulate(std::begin(array), std::end(array), 0);
  return 0;
}

Or std::for_each with a lambda (more flexible if your accumulator gets complicated) :

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int main() {
  auto array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
  int sum { 0 };
  std::for_each(begin(array),end(array),[&](int n){
                        sum += n;  
    });
  std::cout << sum;
  return 0;
}
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