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I suppose my question is exactly what the subject depicts, what does:

class << self

do in Ruby?

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12  
There is a very nice article about this topic written by Yehuda Katz: yehudakatz.com/2009/11/15/… and Yugui: yugui.jp/articles/846 –  Andrei Jul 5 '11 at 19:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 386 down vote accepted

First, the class << foo syntax opens up foo's singleton class (eigenclass). This allows you to specialise the behaviour of methods called on that specific object.

a = 'foo'
class << a
  def inspect
    '"bar"'
  end
end
a.inspect   # => "bar"

a = 'foo'   # new object, new singleton class
a.inspect   # => "foo"

Now, to answer the question: class << self opens up self's singleton class, so that methods can be redefined for the current self object (which inside a class or module body is the class or module itself). Usually, this is used to define class/module ("static") methods:

class String
  class << self
    def value_of obj
      obj.to_s
    end
  end
end

String.value_of 42   # => "42"

This can also be written as a shorthand:

class String
  def self.value_of obj
    obj.to_s
  end
end

Or even shorter:

def String.value_of obj
  obj.to_s
end

When inside a function definition, self refers to the object the function is being called with. In this case, class << self opens the singleton class for that object; one use of that is to implement a poor man's state machine:

class StateMachineExample
  def process obj
    process_hook obj
  end

private
  def process_state_1 obj
    # ...
    class << self
      alias process_hook process_state_2
    end
  end

  def process_state_2 obj
    # ...
    class << self
      alias process_hook process_state_1
    end
  end

  # Set up initial state
  alias process_hook process_state_1
end

So, in the example above, each instance of StateMachineExample has process_hook aliased to process_state_1, but note how in the latter, it can redefine process_hook (for self only, not affecting other StateMachineExample instances) to process_state_2. So, each time a caller calls the process method (which calls the redefinable process_hook), the behaviour changes depending on what state it's in.

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8  
@Jörg: +1 for edit (I wish SO provides the ability to upvote edits; oh well). That indeed is the more common use of class << self, to create class/module methods. I will probably expand on that use of class << self, as that is a much more idiomatic use. –  Chris Jester-Young Mar 24 '10 at 13:25
4  
gsub!("eigenclass", "singleton class"), see the upcoming method redmine.ruby-lang.org/repositories/revision/1?rev=27022 –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 24 '10 at 15:39
    
@Marc-Andre: Wow, that was a very recent decision (capitulation? he seemed very reluctant throughout the thread) on Matz's part. Still, good that there is agreement on what to call it going forward. –  Chris Jester-Young Mar 24 '10 at 15:54
1  
It's really confusing to refer to a's singleton_class since a's class (after changing inspect) is a unique variant of the String class. If it were changing the singleton String class it would affect all other String instances. What's weirder still is that if you later reopen String to redefine inspect then a will still pick up the new changes. –  Old Pro Apr 6 '13 at 16:57
    
@OldPro I still prefer the name eigenclass, as (I believe) Matz also does. But, can't please everyone, I guess. –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 6 '13 at 17:18

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