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I want a Perl regular expression that will match duplicated words in a string.

Given the following input:

$str = "Thus joyful Troy Troy maintained the the watch of night..."

I would like the following output:

Thus joyful [Troy Troy] maintained [the the] watch of night...
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This works:

$str =~ s/\b((\w+)\s+\2)\b/[\1]/g;
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7  
$str =~ s/\b((\w+)(?:\s+\2)+)\b/[\1]/g; to match any number of repetitions –  Eric Strom Mar 24 '10 at 4:24
6  
@briandfoy: ...which is precisely what the question asked for, before you changed it. And Eric posted in a comment a version which matches more than one repetition. –  Kip Mar 24 '10 at 18:49
2  
@brian: I bet the OP knows better than anyone. –  Jon Seigel Mar 24 '10 at 19:42
3  
@brian: I'm gonna go edit some of your questions, because I know your problems better than you do. brb –  Jon Seigel Mar 24 '10 at 19:49
4  
Discussion here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/43842/… –  Shog9 Mar 24 '10 at 20:05

This is similar to one of the Learning Perl exercises. The trick is to catch all of the repeated words, so you need a "one or more" quantifier on the duplication:

 $str = 'This is Goethe the the the their sentence';

 $str =~ s/\b((\w+)(?:\s+\2\b)+)/[\1]/g;

The features I'm about to use are described in either perlre, when they apply at a pattern, or perlop when they affect how the substitution operator does its work.

If you like the /x flag to add insignificant whitespace and comments:

 $str =~ s/
      \b
      (
         (\w+)
         (?:
          \s+
          \2
          \b
         )+
      )
     /[\1]/xg;

I don't like that \2 though because I hate counting relative positions. I can use the relative backreferences in Perl 5.10. The \g{-1} refers to the immediately preceding capture group:

 use 5.010;
 $str =~ s/
      \b
      (
         (\w+)
         (?:
          \s+
          \g{-1}
          \b
         )+
      )
     /[\1]/xg;

Counting isn't all that great either, so I can use labeled matches:

 use 5.010;
 $str =~ s/
      \b
      (
         (?<word>\w+)
         (?:
          \s+
          \k<word>
          \b
         )+
      )
     /[\1]/xg;

I can label the first capture ($1) and access its value in %+ later:

 use 5.010;
 $str =~ s/
      \b
      (?<dups>
         (?<word>\w+)
         (?:
          \s+
          \k<word>
          \b
         )+
      )
     /[$+{dups}]/xg;

I shouldn't really need that first capture though since it's really just there to refer to everything that matched. Sadly, it looks like ${^MATCH} isn't set early enough for me to use it in the replacement side. I think that's a bug. This should work but doesn't:

 $str =~ s/
      \b
         (?<word>\w+)
         (?:
          \s+
          \k<word>
          \b
         )+
     /[${^MATCH}]/pgx;   # DOESN'T WORK

I'm checking this on blead, but that's going to take a little while to compile on my tiny machine.

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2  
+1 for finding a bug in perl. –  Kevin Panko Mar 24 '10 at 18:05

You can try:

$str = "Thus joyful Troy Troy maintained the the watch of night...";
$str =~s{\b(\w+)\s+\1\b}{[$1 $1]}g;
print "$str"; # prints Thus joyful [Troy Troy] maintained [the the] watch of night...

Regex used: \b(\w+)\s+\1\b

Explanation:

  • \b: word bondary
  • \w+: a word
  • (): to remember the above word
  • \s+: whitespace
  • \1: the remembered word

It effectively finds two full words separated by whitespace and places [ ] around them.

EDIT:

If you want to preserve the amount of whitespace between the words you can use:

$str =~s{\b(\w+)(\s+)\1\b}{[$1$2$1]}g;
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this doesn't preserve the amount and type of whitespace between the duplicated words, if that matters to OP –  Kip Mar 24 '10 at 4:07
    
@Kip: you are right. Thanks. I've edited my ans. –  codaddict Mar 24 '10 at 4:10
    
This only finds two words repeated. It would be better if it found all repeated words. :) –  brian d foy Mar 24 '10 at 17:04

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