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This is related to this question: Can I import a TypeScript class from my own module to global?

I have made a module and I want to expose a class to the global scope.

module Foo {
    export class Bar {
        x: number
    }

    /* Some more interfaces and classes to be used only in this module */
}

At first, I made an interface and defined a new variable to achieve this.

interface Bar extends Foo.Bar {
}
var Bar = Foo.Bar;

The generated JavaScript had my Bar as a variable.

var Foo;
(function (Foo) {
    var Bar = (function () {
        function Bar() {
        }
        return Bar;
    })();
    Foo.Bar = Bar;
})(Foo || (Foo = {}));

var Bar = Foo.Bar;
//# sourceMappingURL=app.js.map

The d.ts file included my global Bar interface and variable.

declare module Foo {
    class Bar {
        public x: number;
    }
}
interface Bar extends Foo.Bar {
}
declare var Bar: typeof Foo.Bar;

Then, I noticed that I can simply use import to expose my class, and I did so.

import Bar = Foo.Bar;

The resulting JavaScript file was exactly same.

var Foo;
(function (Foo) {
    var Bar = (function () {
        function Bar() {
        }
        return Bar;
    })();
    Foo.Bar = Bar;
})(Foo || (Foo = {}));
var Bar = Foo.Bar;
//# sourceMappingURL=app.js.map

However, my d.ts file now does not include any information about the global Bar.

declare module Foo {
    class Bar {
        public x: number;
    }
}

Is this an intended result? I think this would cause errors, as it would allow declaring variables with the same name, when I include the JavaScript file and d.ts file in other project.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

When you use an import statement, the compiler assumes that the definition is elsewhere.

For example, if you imported something from fileA.ts into fileB.ts, the generated fileA.d.ts would already contain the declaration, which would then conflict with fileB.d.ts if it also included the declaration.

So I would say that this behaviour is intentional.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't fileA.d.ts have its declaration within its own module? Maybe ModuleA.ClassA. fileB.d.ts would have it on global scope, maybe just ClassA. I think the declaration of ModuleA.ClassA and ClassA should not conflict with each other. –  Kagami Sascha Rosylight Jul 31 at 11:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This turns out to be a bug in current compiler, and new compiler seems to have fixed this. See: https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/346

Corrected declaration:

declare module Foo {
    class Bar {
        x: number;
    }
}
import Bar = Foo.Bar;
share|improve this answer
    
consider using minimal examples next time, we do not need translation of TypeScript code either. –  froginvasion Aug 6 at 15:13

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