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I am developing dense matrix multiplication code (https://github.com/zboson/gemm) to learn about parallel programming. I use OpenMP for the threading. My system has four sockets each with Xeon E5-1620 processor. Each processor has 10 cores/20 hyper-threads. So the total is 40 cores/80 hyper threads. When I run my code on a single thread I get about 70% of the peak flops (13 out of 19.2 GFLOPS). However, when I run my code using 40 threads I only get about 30% of the peak flops (185 out of 682.56 GFLOPS). On a seperate system (Sandy Bridge) with only one socket and 4 cores I get about a 65% efficiency with four threads.

I bind the threads to each physical core using system calls. I have tried disabling this and using instead export OMP_PROC_BIND=true or export GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY="0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29 33 37 2 6 10 14 18 22 26 30 34 38 3 7 11 15 19 23 27 31 35 39" but these makes no difference. I still get about 30% efficiency (though I can get worse efficiency with other bad binding settings).

What more can I do to improve my efficiency? I understand a first touch policy is used so the memory pages are allocated by the first thread that touches them. When I write out the matrix product maybe I should make a separate output for each socket and then merge the results from each socket in the end?

I'm using GCC 4.8.0 with Linux 64-bit kernel 2.6.32

Edit: I use the following binding for matrix size = 2048x2048

export GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY="0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29 33 37 2 6 10 14 18 22 26 30 34 38 3 7 11 15 19 23 27 31 35 39"

This should have threads 0-9 -> node 0, 10-19 node 1, 20-29 node 2, 30-39 node 3.

With this binding I get:

 nthread    efficiency    node
 1          77%           0
 2          76%           0
 4          74%           0
 6          62%           0
 8          64%           0
10          52%           0
14          50%           0+1
16          30%           0+1
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beside nthread, it would be useful to see how it maps on NUMA nodes, e.g. nthreads_node1, nthreads_node2 –  Anton Jul 31 '14 at 12:57
    
@Anton, with the binding I chose t should be threads 0-9 -> node 0, 10-19 node 1, 20-29 node 2, 30-39 node 3 –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 13:00
    
@Anton, actually, it's not so stable the efficiency is 60 with 16 threads for a while then drops to 30% sometimes. n=2048 seems to be to small. –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 13:03
    
it also would be useful to see how efficiency depends on distribution across nodes. e.g. your '16' is likely 10:node1 + 6:node2, what's about 8:node1 + 8:node2? or 4:node1+4:node2+4:node3+4:node4 You probably also need to improve stability of your benchmark - warm up the threads to exclude initialization from measurement, and probably run more iterations of the multiplication (but cache-locality can help for the repeated runs, which can be false-positive depending on your needs) –  Anton Jul 31 '14 at 13:10
    
Okay, let me do some tests. This would be a lot easier if I was using ICC and KMP_AFFINITY instead of GCC. I could write my own version. Maybe I should do that. Thank you for helping me BTW. –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 13:13

1 Answer 1

It is reasonable to suspect that the efficiency drop also because of too many cross-socket communications. But setting thread affinity is not enough to avoid these communications, it should be addressed on the algorithmic level, e.g. partition the work in the way to minimize cross-numa-node interactions. The best approach is to implement it in a cache-oblivious way, e.g. parallel it not by rows or columns but by 2d tiles.

For example, you can use ::parallel_for with blocked_range2d in order to use cache more efficiently.

Dropped efficiency with bigger level of parallelism can also indicate that there are not enough work to justify overheads from synchronization.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any sources or examples on the "algorithmic level". How should I change my algorithm to work better for NUMA? In terms of not enough work then I should see some improvement with matrix size. By default I test 2048x2048 matrices but I can try larger. –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 12:18
    
The efficiency goes to about 40% (as high as 44% sometimes) for 8192x8192 matrices with 40 threads. –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 12:22
    
I'm already using 2D tiles github.com/zboson/gemm. There is no way I would get 70% efficiency (with one thread) without them. Keep in mind I get 65% with four threads on a non-NUMA system. –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 12:34
    
BTW. GOMP_CPU_AFFINITY="0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29 33 37 2 6 10 14 18 22 26 30 34 38 3 7 11 15 19 23 27 31 35 39" was an attempt to minimize cross-numa-node interactions. The Linux topology scatters the cpus so thread 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 correspond to the same node. –  Z boson Jul 31 '14 at 12:37
    
@Zboson, your 65% is for 4 threads, not 40.. huge difference. yo can check whether and how NUMA affects you by running 4 threads, one per socket. –  Anton Jul 31 '14 at 12:41

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