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If the numbers 1 to 5 are written out in words: one, two, three, four, five, then there are 3 + 3 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 19 letters used in total.

If all the numbers from 1 to 1000 (one thousand) inclusive were written out in words, how many letters would be used?

NOTE: Do not count spaces or hyphens. For example, 342 (three hundred and forty-two) contains 23 letters and 115 (one hundred and fifteen) contains 20 letters. The use of "and" when writing out numbers is in compliance with British usage.

My code is below

public class ProjectEuler17 {
public static String[] ones = { "", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five",
    "six", "seven", "eight", "nine", "ten", "eleven", "twelve",
    "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen",
    "eighteen", "nineteen" };

public static String[] tens = { "", "ten", "twenty", "thirty", "forty",
    "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety" };

public static String[] hundreds = { "", "onehundred", "twohundred",
    "threehundred", "fourhundred", "fivehundred", "sixhundred",
    "sevenhundred", "eighthundred", "ninehundred", "oneThousand" };

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(run());
}

public static String run() {
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= 1000; i++)
        sum += convertToWord(i).length();
    return Integer.toString(sum);
}

public static String convertToWord(int n) {
    int unit=n%10;
    int tensdivide = (n / 10)%10;
    int hundreadsdivide = n / 100;
    int hundredModulo=n%100;
    if (n <= 19) {
        //under 20(exclusive)
        return ones[n];
    } else if (n < 100 && n > 19) {
        //from 20 to 100(exclusive)
        return tens[tensdivide] + ones[unit];
    } else {
        /* 100,200,300,400,500 ...1000("onehundred", "twohundred","threehundred", "fourhundred", "fivehundred", "sixhundred",
        "sevenhundred", "eighthundred", "ninehundred", "oneThousand") */

        if(hundredModulo == 0){
                return hundreds[hundreadsdivide] +tens[tensdivide] + ones[unit];
        }else{
            //one hundred and tewnty
            return hundreds[hundreadsdivide] +"and" +tens[tensdivide] + ones[unit];
        }

    }
}

I am getting answer like 21088 which is wrong The Correct Answer is : 21124 Help me if u find some thing wrong also suggest me how to make my code faster.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for Interesting question, and well try. – Ninad Pingale Jul 31 '14 at 10:34
    
How did you calculate 21124 ? and have you checked spellings of strings in arrays ? – Ninad Pingale Jul 31 '14 at 10:36
    
@Ninad Pingale - First I got 21125. then i Entered that answer into Euler site.it was incorrect so i checked it on net.And got to know that Correct answer is 21124 – Kiranaditya Jul 31 '14 at 10:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Problem is with your hundred modulo operation, in its current shape it is evaluating 115 to onehundredandtenfive which is wrong here is the modified piece of logic that should fix your problem

    if(hundredModulo == 0){
            return hundreds[hundreadsdivide] +tens[tensdivide] + ones[unit];
    }else if (hundredModulo <20) {
        return hundreds[hundreadsdivide] +"and" + ones[hundredModulo];
    } else {
        //one hundred and tewnty
        return hundreds[hundreadsdivide] +"and" +tens[tensdivide] + ones[unit];
    }

You are missing the middle condition (else-if).

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