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I have the following piece of code.

#include <stdio.h>
#define d 10+10
int main()
{
    printf("%d",d*d);
    return 0;
}

As 10+10=20, I thought that d would be 20 everywhere in the program. But when I execute d*d, I have expected the result to be d*d=20*20=400. But the result gets printed as 120. Can anyone give me an explanation for this behavior?

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marked as duplicate by Pascal Cuoq Jul 31 '14 at 14:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Macros like this are a simple find & replace. –  teh internets is made of catz Jul 31 '14 at 10:49
1  
The behaviour is not strange, it is exactly what is expected. Macros do textual substitution. d*d -> 10+10*10+10. Of course, any experienced programmer would see the macro definition and put parentheses around 10+10. Or change it to an enum, or const int. –  gnasher729 Jul 31 '14 at 10:49
1  
A nice example of why macro's and arithmetic don't mix well... just like #define SQUARE(n) n*n, is rather unpredictable if used like this SQUARE(++i) –  Elias Van Ootegem Jul 31 '14 at 10:51
    
I think is 120 not 400. ;) –  pablo1977 Jul 31 '14 at 10:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Preprocessor is just doing simple "find & replace", so this code:

printf("%d",d*d);

changes to

printf("%d",10+10*10+10);

which is 10+100+10 = 120

That's why it's so important to add parens in defines:

#define d (10+10)
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Just one thing, the "find & replace" analogy is correct for most cases, but keep in mind that the Preprocessor is more powerful (and dangerous) than that. –  Neowizard Aug 5 '14 at 12:14
printf("%d",d*d);

Here d is replaced as printf("%d",10+10*10+10). so in this case it first executes 10*10 and adds with 10+100+10. so results 120.

To eliminate this-

#define d (10+10) // FIX
int main()
{
   printf("%d",d*d);
   return 0;
}
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Change

#define d 10+10

to

#define d (10+10)

What you get without the proper parentheses is 10+10*10+10 which is the same as 10 + (10 * 10) + 10

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printf("%d",d*d) will evaluate (after preprocessing) to printf("%d", 10+10*10+10);

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