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I still confused on this subject and ask for any help and reference on how to check a visitor IP address via PHP.

I'm know it seems lazy to ask something before attempting to code something to show, but right now, I am also googling to find it. Hopefully someone can give general broad answer or some link to read?

BTW, what is to be considered when we have to code some feature like this?

PS: Thank you very much everybody. It's been enlightening arguments. Frankly, I choose the answer more as respect rather than the truth in it. Because until now I still don't know the right one. Maybe I need more years of learning before I get a firm understanding of the topic itself.

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1  
    
@Mike Better not to link that code. –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 6:30
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@Col Because...? Regardless of the accepted answer can we agree that the actual questions are nearly identical? –  Mike B Mar 24 '10 at 6:34
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Because everyone who upvoted it has no clue. Any code that returns only one IP address and this address ns not the REMOTE_ADDR is wrong. Becasue the only IP address (in terms of TCP/IP protocol) which PHP has is REMOTE_ADDR. The rest is just HTTP headers –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 7:22
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8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

OK, justjoe, I see you got confused with this arguement and there is my big part in it.

Some more explanations for you.

The answer depends on the task. You have 2 options:

If you need only one IP address, you can use only REMOTE_ADDR and nothing else. Take a look at the web-server's access log: there is only one IP address and it's REMOTE_ADDR one. At least it guaranteed you a valid IP address. In many cases, like a traffic counter, it's the only thing you can rely on. Thes is general answer to the "How to get an IP address" question.

If you want to record an address that can be more precise probably - so, no one forbids you from recording many addresses, not one. But of course, you have to record these HTTP headers along with REMOTE_ADDR, not instead of it. There is some use for such a throng of addresses. But you can't rely on it too much. But you can dig some information from it, if you care.

The only case for the FORWARDED_FOR header is a misconfigured webserver, who place the real IP address into this variable. In this case it can be used as an IP address. But of course it must be done manually, in the every particular case, not as the general recommendation. But anyway I'd quit such a webserver as there can't only be one misconfiguration in it.

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thank you very much for the explanation. now i understand what to be consider when creating such feature. I use it for tracking user. While about the scope of ip, i think i only need one. It's important have the right ip. but the code is not obligate to have the real one Everyhing will be store in database. It's more like manual blacklist / whitelist feature. –  justjoe Mar 24 '10 at 13:56
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See $_SERVER, specifically:

$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
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1  
If your client is surfing through a proxy server, then $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] just returns the IP address of the proxy server — not of the client’s machine. That’s not very reliable. This might be a better solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/2505697/… However, do note that getting IP addresses is never fully reliable: stackoverflow.com/questions/1672827/… –  Mathias Bynens Mar 24 '10 at 6:28
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@Mathais Bynens: As or more reliable than any HTTP header you could possibly try and detect. And it doesn't require a boatload of code. –  jasonbar Mar 24 '10 at 6:30
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To get the user IP address you should use this,

$ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']
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1  
If your client is surfing through a proxy server, then $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] just returns the IP address of the proxy server — not of the client’s machine. That’s not very reliable. This might be a better solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/2505697/… However, do note that getting IP addresses is never fully reliable: stackoverflow.com/questions/1672827/… –  Mathias Bynens Mar 24 '10 at 6:28
    
@Mathias Well, can you decide at last which one is "not very reliable"? And how can an HTTP header be more reliable than IP address? –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 6:33
    
you will find your anser inthis , when user use proxy server. function getRealIpAddr() { if (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'])) //check ip from share internet { $ip=$_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP']; } elseif (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'])) //to check ip is pass from proxy { $ip=$_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR']; } else { $ip=$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; } return $ip; } this functionfirst attempt is to get the direct IP address of client’s machine, if not available then try for forwarded for IP address using HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR. –  Sanjay Khatri Mar 24 '10 at 6:40
    
it is not IP addresses you choose from, but HTTP headers. –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 7:23
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General broad answer: everything PHP knows about client is stored in the $_SERVER variable. So, do this code everytime you want particular info to see if you can find something relevant:

echo "<pre>";
print_r($_SERVER);
echo "</pre>";
//or just
phpinfo(32);

$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] is the only IP address you can get, though it can be not a "client address".

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If your client is surfing through a proxy server, then $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] just returns the IP address of the proxy server — not of the client’s machine. That’s not very reliable. This might be a better solution:

function get_ip_address() {
 foreach (array('HTTP_CLIENT_IP', 'HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR', 'HTTP_X_FORWARDED', 'HTTP_X_CLUSTER_CLIENT_IP', 'HTTP_FORWARDED_FOR', 'HTTP_FORWARDED', 'REMOTE_ADDR') as $key) {
  if (array_key_exists($key, $_SERVER)) {
   foreach (explode(',', $_SERVER[$key]) as $ip) {
    $ip = trim($ip); // just to be safe
    if (filter_var($ip, FILTER_VALIDATE_IP, FILTER_FLAG_IPV4 | FILTER_FLAG_IPV6 | FILTER_FLAG_NO_PRIV_RANGE | FILTER_FLAG_NO_RES_RANGE) !== false) {
     self::$ip = $ip;
     return $ip;
    }
   }
  }
 }
}

This has already been discussed on Stack Overflow before. Please refer to “What is the most accurate way to retrieve a user’s correct IP address in PHP?”. The above code is an optimized version of the accepted answer to that question.

However, do note that getting IP addresses is never fully reliable: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1672827/php-ajax-remote-addr-set-to-ip-of-bogus-network-adapter/1678748#1678748

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@col. Shrapnel : how come ? –  justjoe Mar 24 '10 at 6:25
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@Col calling the code stupid and saying it doesn't answer the question are two very different things. –  Mike B Mar 24 '10 at 6:29
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@Mathias 1. Go spoof IP address as easy as HTTP header. 2. IP address is always more reliable than HTTP header. 3. This code tries and fail. –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 6:38
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@Col How many ways can you rephrase the same thing? I'm asking you to explain WHY it is ill-advised to use anything but REMOTE_ADDR and all you seem to respond with is simple insults. I'm not trying to start a religious argument. I'm sure you have a very good reason. I'm just trying to find out what it is. –  Mike B Mar 24 '10 at 6:38
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To chime in... The REMOTE_ADDR is not spoofable. It's the address the TCP/IP protocol confirmed in a three-way handshake in order to establish a two-way connection, so your server can send something back to the client. HTTP headers OTOH are set by the client and could be anything. Also, what business of yours is it to look behind proxies and what could you gain? A bunch of 10.0.1.x addresses probably, which don't help you much either. –  deceze Mar 24 '10 at 6:56
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The following would serve the purpose.

$ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];

echo "IP address is : " :.$ip;
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I suggest you use a third-party IP address to a geo converter to calculate the location. Since you wouldn't have to bare the database space.. Accuracy and the queries.

All you will need to do is something like

http://third-party-url.com?ip=IP_ADDRESS

and it gives back XML or an array of data.

You can use that to do whatever you want later on.

Here are two websites which are popular. * My IP Address Lookup and GeoTargeting * SimpleGeo

There are many such sites.. Maybe others can add them here.

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Just use this at the top of your code:

if (function_exists('apache_request_headers'))
{
    $headers = apache_request_headers();

    if (array_key_exists('X-Forwarded-For', $headers))
    {
        $ips = explode(',',$headers['X-Forwarded-For'],2);
        $_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"]= trim($ips[0]);
    }
}

It will make sure that $_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"] always keep the proper IP address on load balancers applications or not.

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And always keep the wrong IP in case when there are no misconfigured load balancers at all. –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 12:32
    
if there is X-Forwarded-For then how you can have misconfigured load balancers ?, plus if you concern about things like that you won't be porbably using load balancers as well which means above code won't apply to you anyway... –  Marcin Mar 24 '10 at 12:36
    
because X-Forwarded-For is not the load balancer exclusive feature as you probably think. but just very common HTTP header and can be added by any proxy or router. –  Your Common Sense Mar 24 '10 at 12:54
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