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Sorry to ask this question but it looks to me like it breaks referential transparency.

While exploring a problem and breaking it down (the problem is to get the diagonal elements of a list of lists) I came up with this (correctly working) solution:

import Data.List

nums = [[1,2,3,4], [5,6,7,8], [9,10,11,12], [13,14,15,16]]

southwest = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]
southwest2 = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..] . transpose

my_ans = southwest nums ++ southwest2 nums

(N.B. it contains the middle row twice which isn't an issue for my use case)

Now obviously that can easily be refactored. After first trying to write it in a point-free style I figured it would be easier to simply write it non-point-free with these attempts:

my_ans2 x = (diagFunc x) ++ (diagFunc . transpose x)
              where diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]

my_ans3 x = concat [(diagFunc x), (diagFunc . transpose x)]
              where diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]

Now neither of these compiles and works which I find confusing as it seems to me that that would break referential transparency. Could someone explain why I'm wrong about this and how to correctly write this function (extra points go to writing it in a point-free style as I could not).

For reference the error is here:

/home/michael/scripts/temp.hs:14:30:
    Couldn't match expected type ‘[[a]]’
                with actual type ‘a0 -> [[a1]]’
    Relevant bindings include
      x :: [[a]]
        (bound at /home/michael/scripts/project_euler/temp.hs:14:9)
      my_ans2 :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
        (bound at /home/michael/scripts/project_euler/temp.hs:14:1)
    In the second argument of ‘(++)’, namely ‘(diagFunc . transpose x)’
    In the expression: (diagFunc x) ++ (diagFunc . transpose x)
    In an equation for ‘my_ans2’:
        my_ans2 x
          = (diagFunc x) ++ (diagFunc . transpose x)
          where
              diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0 .. ]

/home/michael/scripts/temp.hs:14:41:
    Couldn't match expected type ‘a0 -> [[a1]]’
                with actual type ‘[[a]]’
    Relevant bindings include
      x :: [[a]]
        (bound at /home/michael/scripts/project_euler/temp.hs:14:9)
      my_ans2 :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
        (bound at /home/michael/scripts/project_euler/temp.hs:14:1)
    Possible cause: ‘transpose’ is applied to too many arguments
    In the second argument of ‘(.)’, namely ‘transpose x’
    In the second argument of ‘(++)’, namely ‘(diagFunc . transpose x)’

Again, I'm very sure that I am wrong about this, I just need someone to point out how. :) Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Hmm, I'm not sure I understand the referential transparency bit. Why do you think it would break referential transparency? –  David Young Jul 31 at 22:08
    
@DavidYoung I thought that I had simply substituted the different parts around without changing anything. What I hadn't noticed was implicit brackets around my statements which I had missed (and which Lee helpfully pointed out). This is going from the definition of referential transparancy where an expression is referentially transparent if it can be replaced with it's value. –  Mike H-R Jul 31 at 22:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can fix it with:

my_ans2 x = (diagFunc x) ++ (diagFunc . transpose $ x)
              where diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]

my_ans3 x = concat [(diagFunc x), (diagFunc . transpose $ x)]
              where diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]

The problem is that diagFunc . transpose x is parsed as diagFunc . (transpose x), not (diagFunc . transpose) x as you intend.

You can write this in pointfree style using the monoid instance for functions:

import Data.Monoid

my_ans2' = diagFunc `mappend` (diagFunc . transpose)
  where diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]

The monoid instance for function is available for functions which return monoidal values. Since lists are monoids where mappend = (++) you can use it here. It is defined as:

instance Monoid b => Monoid (a -> b) where
    mempty _ = mempty
    mappend f g x = f x `mappend` g x

so mappend for functions f and g apply f and g to the argument x and combines the results using mappend for the monoid type b. b here is a list, so you end up with

my_ans2' = (f x) ++ (g x)

where f is diagFunc and g is diagFunc . transpose.

As @chi points out in the comments you could also use an applicative solution:

import Control.Applicative

my_ans2'' = (++) <$> diagFunc <*> (diagFunc . transpose)
  where diagFunc = transpose . zipWith (drop) [0..]

which is more general since it does not rely on the return type of the two functions to be monoids.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahhh... brilliant. Thank you. With your explanation now I understand, I knew there was something obvious I was missing. –  Mike H-R Jul 31 at 12:19
    
I couldn't ask as well, can you think of a way to write this in a point free style? I feel like it requires a function that distributes one argument to multiple functions does something like that exist? (almost like tee in bash). –  Mike H-R Jul 31 at 14:23
    
@MikeH-R uncurry (++) . (&&&) diagFunc (diagFunc . transpose) is what you want. Remember to import Control.Arrow. –  chi Jul 31 at 14:28
1  
@MikeH-R (++) <$> diagFunc <*> (diagFunc . transpose) is also a solution, possibly more elegant that using arrows. Lee suggests mappend, which is even more elegant in this case, but is less general in that it requires the codomain of the function to be already a monoid (e.g. lists), and that you want to apply mappend the the function results after having distributed the arguments. –  chi Jul 31 at 14:45
1  
@MikeH-R It takes a while to get used to all these abstract operators. (&&&) is from Control.Arrow using ((-> a) as an arrow. Instead <$> is just fmap with a different nicer symbol, from Control.Applicative using functor ((->) a). <*> is also from there. It is often the case that these operators are not strictly needed (e.g. in your example you can just distribute x to both functions), yet they make the code shorter and nicer. Beware that an heavy abuse of such abstract concepts can easily make your code seem obfuscated. Point-free style can quickly become point-less style. –  chi Jul 31 at 15:05

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