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Let's say this is my class:

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.good_attr = None
        self.really_good_attr = None
        self.another_good_attr = None

Then a caller can set the values on those variables:

a = A()
a.good_attr = 'a value'
a.really_good_attr = 'better value'
a.another_good_attr = 'a good value'

But they can also add new attributes:

a.goood_value = 'evil'

This is not desirable for my use case. My object is being used to pass a number of values into a set of methods. (So essentially, this object replaces a long list of shared parameters on a few methods to avoid duplication and clearly distinguish what's shared and what's different.) If a caller typos an attribute name, then the attribute would just be ignored, resulting in unexpected and confusing and potentially hard to figure out behavior. It would be better to fail fast, notifying the caller that they used an attribute name that will be ignored. So something similar to the following is the behavior I would like when they use an attribute name that doesn't already exist on the object:

>>> a.goood_value = 'evil'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: A instance has no attribute 'goood_value'

How can I achieve this?

I would also like to note that I'm fully aware that a caller can create a new class and do whatever they want, bypassing this entirely. This would be unsupported behavior, though. Making the object I do provide just creates a fail-fast bonehead check to save time against typos for those who do leverage the object I'm providing (myself included), rather than making them scratch their heads wondering why things are behaving in unexpected ways.

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1  
Using __slots__ has the side-effect of doing what you want, but also has some other side-effects that you need to be aware of (like messing up some introspection abilities) –  roippi Jul 31 '14 at 14:43
    
Related and in addition to Martijn Pieters: outside the class you have access to a.__dict__ –  fredtantini Jul 31 '14 at 14:55
    
@fredtantini: not if you use the __slots__ option. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 31 '14 at 14:58
    
@MartijnPieters : indeed, it seems that's not explicit in the link you gave. –  fredtantini Jul 31 '14 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can hook into attribute setting with the __setattr__ method. This method is called for all attribute setting, so take into account it'll be called for your 'correct' attributes too:

class A(object):
    good_attr = None
    really_good_attr = None
    another_good_attr = None

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if not hasattr(self, name):
            raise AttributeError(
                '{} instance has no attribute {!r}'.format(
                    type(self).__name__, name))
        super(A, self).__setattr__(name, value)

Because good_attr, etc. are defined on the class the hasattr() call returns True for those attributes, and no exception is raised. You can set those same attributes in __init__ too, but the attributes have to be defined on the class for hasattr() to work.

The alternative would be to create a whitelist you could test against.

Demo:

>>> a = A()
>>> a.good_attr = 'foo'
>>> a.bad_attr = 'foo'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<string>", line 10, in __setattr__
AttributeError: A instance has no attribute 'bad_attr'

A determined developer can still add attributes to your instance by adding keys to the a.__dict__ instance dictionary, of course.

Another option is to use a side-effect of using __slots__; slots are used to save memory as a dictionary takes a little more space than just putting values directly into the C structure Python creates for each instance (no keys and dynamic table are needed then). That side-effect is that there is no place for more attributes on such a class instance:

class A(object):
    __slots__ = ('good_attr', 'really_good_attr', 'another_good_attr')

    def __init__(self):
        self.good_attr = None
        self.really_good_attr = None
        self.another_good_attr = None

The error message then looks like:

>>> a = A()
>>> a.good_attr = 'foo'
>>> a.bad_attr = 'foo'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'A' object has no attribute 'bad_attr'

but do read the caveats listed in the documentation for using __slots__.

Because there is no __dict__ instance attribute when using __slots__, this option really closes the door on setting arbitrary attributes on the instances.

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I'm opting for __setattr__ with a whitelist (stored in a variable __attr_whitelist so it gets name mangled to discourage messing with it). This seems the least intrusive and to have the least extra side effects. As a bonehead check, I don't think I need to worry too much about the access to __dict__. If someone is that determined, they'll just modify the code or create a different class. –  jpmc26 Jul 31 '14 at 15:01

make the parameter private by adding two underscores to it, ex self.__good_attr, this way someone can't set that parameter outside of the class. Then make a function that sets the __good_attr variable and have that function throw an exception if it's wrong.

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This sounds to me like it's an Java-inspired idea. It would work, but using setters and getters is not pythonic at all. Python has ways to do this without obvious setters and getters. –  kratenko Jul 31 '14 at 14:55
1  
I agree it's very java/c++ inspired. I didn't know about the setattr and slots. I just suggested the first thing that came to mind. You learn something new everyday around here :D –  notorious Jul 31 '14 at 16:06

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