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I'm playing with Generics and in a method with two generic parameters try to cast an object to interface, which doesn't work. The below code demonstrates problem:

    private void GenericMethod<T, U>() 
        where T : Block
        where U : IBlock
    {
        var list = new List<T>();

        // this casting works
        var item = new Block();
        var iItem = (IBlock)item;

        foreach (var l in list)
        { 
            // this doesn't compile
            var variable = (U)l;
        }
    }

Here Block is a class and IBlock is interface implemented by this class.

Why does casting (U)l fail? How can I do it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If T inherits from Block, and U from IBlock it does not mean T will inherit from U even if Block inherits from IBlock. For example:

public class TBlock : Block
{
   public void NewMethod() {}
}

public interface UIBlock : IBlock
{
   void AnotherNewMethod();
}

To make this example work, you'd have to change

where T : Block
where U : IBlock

to

where U : IBlock
where T : Block, U

to make sure T inherits from U.

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1  
this works, thank you –  lekso Jul 31 '14 at 20:30

You can cast your iterator. https://dotnetfiddle.net/FgKdL8

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
    }

    private void GenericMethod<T, U>() 
        where T : Block
        where U : IBlock
    {
        var list = new List<U>();

        // this casting works
        var item = new Block();
        var iItem = (IBlock)item;

        // cast your iterator
        foreach (U l in list)
        { 

        }
    }

    public interface IBlock
    {}
    public class Block : IBlock
    {}
}
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Hehe, resolving the problem by deleting the offending code line, ehh...? –  elgonzo Jul 31 '14 at 20:24
    
No. I did write the code and check myself: dotnetfiddle.net/j023DV –  Believe2014 Jul 31 '14 at 20:25
    
Yes, you did delete the code line that is relevant to the question: var variable = (U)l;. –  elgonzo Jul 31 '14 at 20:25
1  
That line is deleted because you no longer need it. Instead of using the var variable = (U)l; you can directly use the iterator l. –  Believe2014 Jul 31 '14 at 20:27
    
Oops, okay. I stand corrected. Didn't see that you explicitly made l a variable of type IBlock ... easy to miss ... :) –  elgonzo Jul 31 '14 at 20:28

While you can convert T to IBlock, you can't know if it will be convertible to U, as far as the rules are - U implements IBLock but can be any type.

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To be pedantic: U implements IBlock but can be any type, not necessarily a class. –  ahruss Jul 31 '14 at 20:37
    
:-) thanks, edited –  shahar Jul 31 '14 at 20:52

If you can guarantee that T will inherit U, you can add that constraint to the declaration:

where U : IBlock where T : Block, U

If you want the function to still work either way, but cast to U if possible (I can't really imagine why you'd want this, but...), you can do this:

public GenericMethod<T, U>()
    where T : Block
    where U : class, IBlock // must be a class to use the `as` operator 
{
    // ... 
    var variable = item as U;
} 
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If you CANNOT guarantee that T will inherit U, it will fail, period. Also, we can't use class as the OP has told us that U is an interface, but then, I see no reason why we can't use as with an interface. –  James Curran Jul 31 '14 at 21:00

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