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I'm performing the simplest test on the following class (inside model's folder):

class Offer
  attr_accessor :title, :payout, :thumbnail

  def initialize(title, payout, thumbnail)
    @title = title
    @payout = payout
    @thumbnail = thumbnail
  end
end

The thing is there's no 'offers' db table. The objects created out of this class are never saved in a database.

Then i perform the tests using rspec:

describe Offer do

  it "has a valid factory" do
    expect(FactoryGirl.create(:offer)).to be_valid
  end
    ...
end

and FactoryGirl:

FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :offer do
    skip_create
    title { Faker::Name.name }
    payout { Faker::Number.number(2) }
    thumbnail { Faker::Internet.url }

    initialize_with { new(title, payout, thumbnail)}
  end
end

And i get the following error:

> undefined method `valid?' for #<Offer:0x00000002b78958>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because your Offer class is not inheriting from ActiveRecord::Base, you're not getting any of the stuff that comes along with it (such as validations). valid? is a method provided through ActiveRecord's modules, not by Ruby directly, so it won't be available on a basic Ruby class.

If all you care about is validations, then you can include the ActiveModel::Validations module in your class and it will give you valid? as well as validates_presence_of, etc.:

class Offer
  include ActiveModel::Validations
  ...
end

You can also just include ActiveModel to get a couple other things such as ActiveRecord's naming and conversion benefits (as well as validation).

share|improve this answer
    
thank's Dylan, sounds pretty obvious now. –  ntonnelier Jul 31 at 22:14

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