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I have doubts about what the typical approach is to declaring variables that are part of a library. For example with the getopt.h library. It declares opterr and optarg so that they may be used outside the getopt() function call; I think they may have different declarations for these variables depending on the compiler's implementation.

I tried some possible solutions and compiled them in Windows gcc (in all of them including <getop.h>):

  1. Declare the variables in the same way that they are declared in .../usr/include/getopt.h. This compiles without throwing warnings/errors in Windows, but I think there are no guarantees that the same thing will happen in other compilers/OSes, and most probably will end up throwing an error at compile time, so I think this way is not the correct way to make portable C code.

  2. Just declare the variables in the simplest way like extern int opterr and extern char * optarg. this gives me a warning "Redeclared without the dll import atribute: previously dll import ignored" (the variables in getopt.h are declared as extern int __declspec(dllimport) opterr and extern char __declspec(dllimport) *optarg).

  3. No declaration in my code of the variables if they are included in a library (header) — simply use #include <getopt.h> and no other declarations for the variables. (This doesn't give a warning.) I am almost certain that this will work in any compiler, but doesn't seem to be the cleanest way of coding to me; I think the variables should be declared in all files where they are used.

So how would you do it, with the purpose to write portable and clean code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A header file such as getopt.h is not a library. However, it is a file used by the people who build the library to declare the variables and functions that are made available as part of the library. It is also made available to users of the library so that by including the header in their code, the compiler will know how the library was built. This is the whole point of headers; they make sure that separate source files can be compiled with consistent declarations for the functions and variables.

Your option (1) is not portable; details such as __declspec(dllimport) have no meaning on Unix systems (or in standard C).

Your option (2) doesn't work properly; the compiler complained, legitimately, about having competing declarations for the same variables.

Your option (3) doesn't work; you can't use variables without a previous declaration. If you don't specify a declaration for optarg, there is no way to access it.

The clarified option (3) — use #include <getopt.h> — is precisely the best way to go about it.

The rest of the answer below says as much, but was written out because the original version of option (3) was not as clearly written as it is now.

Thus, if your purpose is to write portable and clean code, you use the header that is provided to make your code portable and clean. If there are platform-specific issues (such as __declspec(dllimport)) to deal with, the header deals with it for you. Your code is clean because it simply uses the declarations provided by the header that was written by the people who wrote the library. It is correct for the platform for which it was created.

Basically, if a service (function and variables) is defined in a header on all the platforms of interest to you, then use that header and don't try to second-guess the systems. If you run into issues because the declarations are in different headers on different platforms, or not available on some platform, you have to work harder, but the goal should always be to use the system provided header whenever possible. You might end up with a cover header in your system (perhaps #include "wrapper/getopt.h") that simply includes <getopt.h> when it is available, but provides equivalent declarations on those platforms where it is not available. You'd need a fallback implementation for the platforms where the base functionality is not available. Or, if the behaviour is radically different on different machines, you write your code to an abstraction layer of your own devising, and then implement the abstraction in different ways on different machines.

Note that the C Standard defines what goes in <stdio.h>. You can use what the C Standard says will be provided with confidence. An implementation may provide extensions over the standard; you cannot use those extensions in portable code (though you can use them in clean code). You'd be foolish indeed to try second guessing or repeating what's in <stdio.h>; it is a large and complex header. Portable code could certainly not try using anything other than the local <stdio.h> reliably.

Finally, remember that the compiler proper sees a translation unit (TU) which is the result of the C preprocessor combining the source code from the named source file and its included headers, modified by the conditional inclusion and exclusion of material from the headers and the source code. The compiler is not aware (except for diagnostic or debugging code) of where any particular token came from; it is all just part of the single TU.

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With my option (3) I mean to include <getopt.h> and not to declare any of the used variables again, just making the header deal with any platform-specific issue. Reading your answer it seems to be the right choise, that was what you mean if I understand properly? (I'm sorry, my english is not very good). –  sir psycho sexy Aug 1 '14 at 18:15
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Yes; the correct solution is to include <getopt.h> and not try to declare the variables yourself. I did not understand that from the current description of your option 3. Basically, if a service (function and variables) is defined in a header on all the platforms of interest to you, then use that header and don't try to second-guess the system. If you run into issues because the declarations are in different headers on different platforms, or not available on some platform, you have to work harder, but the goal should always be to use the system provided header whenever possible. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 1 '14 at 18:19

getopt.h is not the library, but a header file. Most of that file will be declarations of functions that are defined (implemented) in the DLL. The file also seems to declare some variables opterr and optarg. Thus, your third item "not declare the variables" is correct, except that by including the header file with #include "getopt.h" you actually are declaring the variables. In other words, the whole point of a header file is to provide the correct and consistent function (and variable) declarations to all those compilation units that include them. For an example, see section Purpose in Include directive.

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