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Recently I tried compiling program something like this with GCC:

int f(int i){
    if(i<0){ return 0;}
    return f(i-1);
f(100000);

and it ran just fine. When I inspected the stack frames the compiler optimized the program to use only one frame, by just jumping back to the beginning of the function and only replacing the arguments to f. And - the compiler wasn't even running in optimized mode.

Now, when I try the same thing in Python - I hit maximum recursion wall (or probably stack overflow if i set recursion depth too high).

Is there way that a dynamic language like python can take advantage of these nice optimizations? Maybe it's possible to use a compiler instead of an interpreter to make this work?

Just curious!

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Nice question. Something that I have forgotten all about whilst comparing static to dynamic languages. –  WeNeedAnswers Mar 24 '10 at 12:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The optimisation you're talking about is known as tail call elimination - a recursive call is unfolded into an iterative loop.

There has been some discussion of this, but the current situation is that this will not be added, at least to cpython proper. See Guido's blog entry for some discussion.

However, there do exist some decorators that manipulate the function to perform this optimisation. They generally only obtain the space saving though, not time (in fact, they're generally slower)

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What about the stackless python? Does it implement tail call optimization? –  drozzy Mar 24 '10 at 20:57
    
bump**bump**bump –  drozzy Mar 25 '10 at 20:37
    
@drozzy: Not entirely sure. I think it may. I have tried it out on pypy (including the stackless version), but it doesn't look like it implements it (at least currently) –  Brian Mar 26 '10 at 14:54

When I inspected the stack frames the compiler optimized the program to use only one frame, by just jumping back to the beginning of the function and only replacing the arguments to f.

What you're describing is called "tail recursion". Some compilers/interpreters support it, some don't. Most don't, in fact. As you noticed, gcc does. And in fact, tail recursion is a part of the spec for the Scheme programming language, so all Scheme compilers/interpreters must support tail recursion. On the other hand, the compilers for languages like Java and Python (as well as most other languages, I'd wager) don't do tail recursion.

Is there way that a dynamic language like python can take advantage of these nice optimizations?

Do you mean, right now, or are you asking in more abstract terms? Speaking abstractly, yes! It would absolutely be possible for dynamic languages to take advantage of tail recursion (Scheme does, for example). But speaking concretely, no, CPython (the canonical Python interpreter) doesn't have a flag or other parameter to enable tail recursion.

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Are functional programs already looking for the tail recursive problem because of the nature of using the stack so much whilst imperatives such as C#, Java, are using mainly heap storage. Curious enough though, 64 bit .net doesn't blow the stack, although 32 bit version does. I know that in F#, the work around is making the function recursive by declaring it so in syntax (rec). –  WeNeedAnswers Mar 24 '10 at 12:45

It has nothing to do with the fact that it is a dynamic language or that it is interpreted. CPython just doesn't implement Tail Recursion optimization. You may find that JPython etc do.

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Really? I thought one of the strong points of compilation was for looking for such optimisation strategies? I agree that it doesn't matter if the program is compiled or interpreted, but the optimisation is a strong candidate for the strengths of compilation, one being that you can look for tail recursion. –  WeNeedAnswers Mar 24 '10 at 12:50
    
@WeNeed Even if the language is interpreted it can still go through an optimization phase it just can't be as long as with something like C. –  Yacoby Mar 24 '10 at 13:41
    
does that mean then that it is a lot nicer and easier for the interpreter, if you tell it before hand that it needs to do some optimising, like in F# and the "rec" keyword? –  WeNeedAnswers Mar 24 '10 at 14:24

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