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I might be creepy but I am testing something and I kind of don't understand the purpose of there three events...
so here is my testcode:

    <div id="timeBU"></div>
    <div id="timeL"></div>
    <div id="timeUL"></div>
    <div id="text"></div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function loading(message, timeId) {
            var secs=0;
            var interval = setInterval(function() {
                document.getElementById(timeId).innerHTML = secs;
                secs++;
            },1);
            document.getElementById("text").innerHTML += "<br>"+message+"<br>";
        }

        // first way
        window.addEventListener("beforeunload", loading("beforeunload", "timeBU"));
        window.addEventListener("load", loading("load", "timeL"));
        window.addEventListener("unload", loading("unload", "timeUL"));

        // second way
        // window.onunload = loading("beforeunload", "timeBU");
        // window.onload = loading("load", "timeL");
        // window.onbeforeunload = loading("unload", "timeUL");
    </script>

it desn't matters I use first way or second way, but anyways I posted both... What I am saying, that output depend on the order of //first way code or //second way code, which listener is added first, that function's message is displayed first... you can try swapping places... but time is all the same (you can increase interval or alert something for better view), that makes me think that all three events behave same...

Note: I've tested this only for chrome

my extra question is:
How can I differ whether user just opened my site or reloaded?

if you have some kind of advices about my extra question, I would be grateful...

share|improve this question
    
Below I answered your main question (why that events seem the same thing), your extra question has been answered many times (also here on SO), for example (random pick from a long list) in this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/5004978/… – Adriano Repetti Aug 1 '14 at 11:10
    
Thanks for help! – Ratty Aug 1 '14 at 11:44
    
@Adriano Repetti window.addEventListener("beforeunload",function() { document.getElementById("text").innerHTML +="alert should be now"; alert("asd"); }); for me text is displayed but alert isn't fired, is it normal? – Ratty Aug 1 '14 at 11:46
1  
Yes, you're inserting HTML text, it won't be executed as script (even if it contains JS code). JS code can be in an href target (with javascript: prefix), in DOM events (such us onload) and inside script tags. Anything else won't be evaluated (unless some other JS code does it like jQuery when you inject script tags). See also this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/1197575/… – Adriano Repetti Aug 1 '14 at 11:56
1  
yes, text will flash because for the short time between onbeforeunload and when page will be reloaded it'll be present. alert won't fire (be executed) because script won't be executed (see link in my previous comment). Anyway if you just put JS there (without script tag) it's not even a script but simple plain text. Moreover usually alerts after onbeforeunload aren't displayed (sometimes - browser dependent - just inside that event handler, sometimes anywhere after event has been fired). – Adriano Repetti Aug 1 '14 at 12:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because you're calling loading() function, you're not using as a callback:

window.addEventListener("beforeunload", loading("beforeunload", "timeBU"))

That line calls loading() (so your message is printed) and passes its return value (nothing) to addEventListener() as callback. Nothing will be performed when event will be fired.

It's not how I'd suggest to do it but try instead this:

window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function () {
    loading("beforeunload", "timeBU")
});
share|improve this answer

This code worked for me. (tested in firefox & chrome). The only difference now is that loading(message, timeId) now returns a function which gets called as a callback. Events always require you to pass a Callback (which refers to a function) which gets called as soon as the event is called.

<div id="timeBU"></div>
<div id="timeL"></div>
<div id="timeUL"></div>
<div id="text"></div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function loading(message, timeId) {
        return function(){
            var secs=0;
            var interval = setInterval(function() {
                document.getElementById(timeId).innerHTML = secs;
                secs++;
            },1);
            document.getElementById("text").innerHTML += "<br>"+message+"<br>";
        }
    }


    window.addEventListener("beforeunload", loading("beforeunload", "timeBU"));
    window.addEventListener("load", loading("load", "timeL"));
    window.addEventListener("unload", loading("unload", "timeUL"));
</script>
share|improve this answer

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