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Let's say I have some sort of game. I have a buyItem function like this:

buyItem: function (req, res) {
    // query the users balance
    // deduct user balance
    // buy the item
}

If I spam that route until the user balance is deducted (the 2nd query) the user's balance is still positive.

What I have tried:

buyItem: function (req, res) {
    if(req.session.user.busy) return false;
    req.session.user.busy = true;
    // query the users balance
    // deduct user balance
    // buy the item
}

The problem is req.session.user.busy will be undefined for the first ~5 requests. So that doesn't work either.

How do we handle such situations? I'm using the Sails.JS framework if that is important.

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Can't you just call .update() on the model and skip the query for the balance? –  mscdex Aug 1 '14 at 11:46
    
You gave me an idea. You mean setting balance must be positive in the database and then running the update query, right? If it was successful (so the balance is still positive) we can credit the item? –  Martijn19 Aug 1 '14 at 11:53
    
Yeah, just set the update conditions such that it's restricted to that user with a balance greater than or equal to the item's price. If the query was successful, then add the item to their list/inventory/whatever. –  mscdex Aug 1 '14 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you need is a transaction. Sails doesn't support transactions at the framework level yet (it's on the roadmap) but if you're using a database that supports them (like Postgres or MySQL), you can use the .query() method of your model to access the underlying adapter and run native commands. Here's an example:

buyItem: function(req, res) {
  try {
    // Start the transaction
    User.query("BEGIN", function(err) {
      if (err) {throw new Error(err);}
      // Find the user
      User.findOne(req.param("userId").exec(function(err, user) {
        if (err) {throw new Error(err);}
        // Update the user balance
        user.balance = user.balance - req.param("itemCost");
        // Save the user
        user.save(function(err) {
          if (err) {throw new Error(err);}
          // Commit the transaction
          User.query("COMMIT", function(err) {
            if (err) {throw new Error(err);}
            // Display the updated user
            res.json(user);
          });
        });
      });
    });
  } 
  // If there are any problems, roll back the transaction
  catch(e) {
    User.query("ROLLBACK", function(err) {
      // The rollback failed--Catastrophic error!
      if (err) {return res.serverError(err);}
      // Return the error that resulted in the rollback
      return res.serverError(e);
    });
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for providing an example. This is actually very helpful. Seems not too hard to implement. I'll mark this as the accepted answer. –  Martijn19 Aug 3 '14 at 15:41

I haven't tested this out. But as long as your not using multiple instances or clusters, you should just be able to store the status in memory. Because node is single threaded there shouldn't be any problems with atomicity.

var inProgress = {};

function buyItem(req, res) {
    if (inProgress[req.session.user.id]) {
        // send error response
        return;
    }

    inProgress[req.session.user.id] = true;

    // or whatever the function is..
    req.session.user.subtractBalance(10.00, function(err, success) {
        delete inProgress[req.session.user.id];

        // send success response
    });
}
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